Archive for April, 2010

Zoysia: Fertilizing New Plugs


posted on April 27th, 2010 by Steve Schug

Amazoy Zoysia is known to grow in virtually any soil: clay, salty, sandy, and even rocky soils. So no matter what kind of soil is under your grass, it is pretty likely that zoysia will grow. But any grass can do with a little nourishment. If you are looking to speed up the process of plug establishment, fertilizer is a great place to start.

Fertilizing Zoysia PlugsIf you do decide that fertilizer is for you, one very important rule is be sure to NOT use granular fertilizers. These can be hazardous to your plugs and can destroy an established zoysia lawn. Using a water-soluble fertilizer, like Nutri-20, is the way to go. These types are better suited for zoysia grass and will help nourish them in the right ways. You can even use it for your garden; water-soluble fertilizers do wonders for vegetables, flowers, and shrubs, too.

Planting Zoysia Grass Plugs


posted on April 20th, 2010 by Steve Schug

Once you have ordered and received your Amazoy Zoysia grass plugs, your next step is actual planting. And with over five decades of experience in harvesting, packaging, delivery, and planting, we have this planting process down to a science. Before you begin planting, there are a few things to think about.

First, be sure it is the right time of year for you to plant. Zoysia can be planted throughout the spring, summer, and fall, but check out our map to see when is the premium season for your region. Next, you must finish separating the plugs with shears. This is because in our attempt to ensure maximum freshness for you, the plugs are not cut entirely through before shipment.

Finally, you must have a planting plan. Using our example diagram, plan where you are going to place your zoysia plugs. Holes should be made no more than a foot apart. If you want your new lawn to fill in more quickly, you can plant your plugs closer together (half a foot apart). When you are finally ready to put the plugs into the ground, consult the planting instructions that come with each order. But just in case you misplace them, you can follow the steps below.

Planting Instructions

1. Mow your existing lawn as low as possible.
2. Ensure that your ground is workable and moist enough for planting.
3. Once you have determined a starting point, insert the plugger into the ground to remove established grass. You can also drill a hole, depending on the tool you are using. Now you will have a hole for your plugs.
4. Put the zoysia plug in the hole you just created, filling in around the edges with loose soil. Make sure to only bury the roots, as the living plant needs sunlight to grow.
5. Lightly compress the plug into the ground with the heel of your foot or hand.
6. Water LIGHTLY.

To see the proper way to plant, check out this video:

Got Bugs?


posted on April 12th, 2010 by Steve Schug

Luckily, because of the nature of our Amazoy Zoysia, insects and pests are not as common a problem as with regular grasses. Established Amazoy is pretty resistant to most pests and the threat they may hold to grass.

However, there are some exceptions. Amazoy is not resistant to grubs, mole crickets, cinch bugs, and nematodes, especially newly planted plugs. If you have experienced any of these pests, we recommend that you treat for these before planting your plugs. If you don’t, these aggressive pests may eat the tender roots of your new Amazoy Zoysia grass.

If for some reason, insects present a problem after your grass has been established, no need to worry. Zoysia is good at resisting injury from most chemicals when pest problems arise.

Knowing Your Lawn: Soil


posted on April 6th, 2010 by Steve Schug

Keeping your lawn maintained and looking great starts with knowing what is underneath it: soil. You might think “dirt is dirt”, but in fact, soil can have quite the range. Being knowledgeable of what kind of soil you have in your yard will help you make the right choices for your lawn.

There are a few things you should be considering when thinking about soil and lawn care maintenance.

Test Your Soil

First, you should test your soil. Knowing what kind of soil you’ve got will help you know what nutrients you need. You can test your soil using a pH meter or a soil test kit.

Your pH meter will tell you the pH of your soil, which will range from 3 to 10 on the pH scale (see below). A 7 on the scale marks neutrality; any soil above that is considered basic or alkaline, while anything below is considered acidic. Most good soils will range from 5-7.

Discover Your Soil Type

After finding out the pH of your soil, you should grab a handful of your soil to discover the texture and type. If your handful of soil holds shape, it is clay-like. If it doesn’t it will be more sandy.

Clay like soil has a few advantages. It holds moisture and nutrients well, which means less time watering and less money spent on fertilizers. Despite this, there are a few disadvantages.

Clay like soil has poor drainage, allowing it to become oversaturated and deprive plants from the oxygen it needs. It can also warm slowly in spring, shortening the planting season. When it does dry, it can crust or crack, causing plant roots to tear.

Sandy soil has advantages. It drains easily and quickly, allowing for oxygen. It also is easily worked, and warms quickly in spring, allowing for quick planting. Despite these things, it also tends to have a low capacity for holding both moisture, needing more water and fertilizer. It is also subject to erosion.

An ideal soil is something in between sandy and clay like. To read more about soil types, click here.

Fix It

If you’ve got clay like or sandy soil, there are a few things you can do to alter it to your needs. Add a generous amount of organic matter, like compost, manure, or peat moss. Spread a layer, between 3 or 4 inches thick, over your existing soil. Then thoroughly incorporate it into your existing soil. Be sure to do this, because just adding a layer on top won’t help.

Remember, do add organic matter in moderation. Too much can be harmful and toxic to your lawn.

Your Soil and Zoysia Plugs

Luckily, zoysia can grow in a variety of soils. But it is always best to alter your soil before planting plugs. It will help encourage your zoysia lawn establish and grow hearty and lush.