Archive for February, 2013

How Many Plugs Do I Need


posted on February 25th, 2013 by

How Many Plugs Should One Buy?

When you are ready to start your Amazoy zoysia lawn, the first thing you need to do is measure the area for the square footage. Following the steps below will assist you in calculating how many plugs you will need.  We recommend 2 plugs per every square foot.  Planting at this rate it will take about 1 to 1 1/2 seasons (years) for your zoysia plugs to completely fill in. You can increase or decrease the number of plugs per square foot, however this will alter the fill in time.

To determine the total number of plugs required, measure the length and width of the area to be covered. There is no need to be exact, getting the approximate length by width and adding a bit to both will ensure you order enough plugs.  It may make it easier if you break the area down in sections, for example if you are planting your entire lawn your backyard would be one section, side lawn would be the second section and front lawn would be the third section.

Once you have the measurements, enter them in our plug calculator and it will determine the number of plugs you need whether you are planting one plug every square foot or up to 4 plugs per square foot. The calculator will help figure out how many plugs you need if your lawn is circular, triangular, or free-form in shape, just break these areas down into smaller blocks.  You can enter up to eight areas on the calculator at one time.

Different types of Zoysia Grass


posted on February 15th, 2013 by

 ZoysiaLawn

Many people do not realize that there are numerous strains of zoysia grass, all are a little different.   Below are a few of the commonly used strains of zoysia to show you how they are different. Let’s start with Amazoy our name for Meyers, Z-52 the original zoysia grass.

Amazoy – Medium leaf blade, deep green color, very tight growth pattern, low maintenance, drought resistance, moderate shade tolerance and very cold tolerant but will not suffer winter damage from cold. Is usually planted as plugs, can be laid as sod.

Emerald – Fine leaf blade, dark green color, tight growth pattern, high maintenance, drought resistance, moderate shade tolerance and warm weather only, cold weather can damage it, is usually planted professionally as sod, can be planted as plugs.

Zenith – Medium leaf blade, deep green color, tight growth pattern, drought resistant, average maintenance, moderate shade tolerance, good cold tolerance, usually planted by seed (recommended to be done by professionals) can be planted by plugs.

Let’s compare, Amazoy has a medium leaf blade, grows very tight (crowds out weeds the best), giving it the feel of walking on a deep carpet, low maintenance. Only needs mowing a few times during the season; Amazoy is very drought resistant, therefore requires less watering. Amazoy will grow in partial shade and can withstand cold temperatures, up to 30 below.

Emerald has a fine leaf, tight growth pattern, (not as tight as Amazoy), requires high maintenance. It requires about 1 ½ inches of water a week and mowing about every 7 to 10 days, will grow in partial shade, but only grows well in warm weather.

Zenith has a medium blade, tight growth pattern, drought resistant and is fairly cold tolerant.  Zenith is usually planted from seed however you must have a bare seedbed, if planted within an existing lawn there is a high failure rate.  Can only be planted from spring to early summer and must be kept moist at least 15 to 25 days and then watered at least once a day for the next 8 to 10 weeks.  Seeding is recommended for professionals only.

Choosing a Grass


posted on February 1st, 2013 by

                                    

               What is the right grass for you? 

With so many different types of grasses available, how do you know what grass is right for you?  There are several different aspects you will need to consider.  First you need to decide what kind of grass you are going to plant, fescue, rye, Bermuda, St. Augustine, zoysia, etc.  Be sure to check on the different strains the grasses have, each one is a little different.   

It is best to look at the main characteristic such as, how is the grass planted; seed, plugs, sod, etc.  Consider what you want from your grass, such as color, maintenance, water requirements, growth pattern, blade size, dormancy, reproduction and durability as well as cost.

It is important to check all of these aspects of the grass. 

  • Color – Some are a light green, deep green, dark green, blue green, etc.
  • Maintenance – How much is required? How frequent does the lawn need to be mowed, watered, fertilized, weed control applied, etc.
  • Watering requirements - Is the grass drought resistant?  Does your area have water restrictions?  What is the average amount of water the grass requires?
  • Blade Size and texture - Do you want a thin blade, medium blade or wide blade? Do you want a grass that feels course, soft grass or a grass that feels like carpet?
  • Growth pattern -  Is the grass a spreading grass or does it need to be reseeded each year?  
  • Seasons – Do you want a grass that will stay green all summer, then you want a “warm” weather grass. Do you want a cold weather grass that can brown out in summer during extreme heat but stays green in the winter?
  • Durability – How much wear and tear can the grass tolerant? Will it hold up to children and pets?
  • Slopes – Do you want a grass with low maintenance and good erosion control or seed the area and hope the seeds take before washing away?

 There is a lot to consider and research, however remember your lawn is something you will want to enjoy for a long, long time. The right decision can make a huge difference!