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Fertilizing Your Zoysia Lawn: Granular vs. Water Soluble Fertilizers


posted on July 14th, 2010 by Steve Schug

There are many different types of fertilizers that claim to help nourish your lawn. With all the options that are out there, it is difficult to know which is right for your lawn. You should be aware of what kind of fertilizer is right for an Amazoy zoysia lawn.

Granular Fertilizers

Granular fertilizers are probably the type of fertilizer you are most familiar with. While these are most common and popular with homeowners, they are not best for your zoysia lawn.

Granular fertilizers tend to simply sit on the surface of grass, causing burns that could damage your plugs. The nutrients never reach the roots, where they are most needed.

Water Soluble Fertilizers

Water Soluble Fertilizers allow for the fertilizer to dissolve in the water, which takes the nutrients directly to the roots. This provides your grass with vital food elements that help it grow to become lush and healthy.

Read more about our own fertilizer, Nutri-20, and how to apply it.

Organic Lawn Care


posted on July 7th, 2010 by Steve Schug

As we learn more and more about how to best take care of the earth around us, here are a few tips on how to make lawn care more eco-friendly.

Water

Most grasses only require an inch of water per week, and with zoysia grass, that is even less. Be wary of how much you are watering; too much can be bad for your lawn and your wallet.

To give the grass the water it needs, water in the early morning or evening so that less evaporation occurs. Also, think about using rain barrels to reduce dependence on your town or city’s water source. It can also save you money.

Mowers

While electric mowers can save gas emissions, they still use up energy resources. Try using a reel mower. While older reel mowers might have a bad reputation, newer reel mowers have sharp blades and cut just as well as electric

Clippings

Next time you think to buy fertilizer for your lawn, consider leaving lawn clippings. Lawn clippings can provide as a great natural fertilizer and don’t cause thatch buildup.

Nutrients

When adding nutrient to alter your soil, make sure that you are using organic products like organic lime or elemental sulfur. This will help your soil absorb sunlight and water the appropriate way, ultimately conserving resources.

Mow Your Lawn the RIGHT Way: Lawn Care the Old Way


posted on June 15th, 2010 by Steve Schug

Are you really mowing your lawn the right way? Most people aren’t exceptionally fond of this lawn maintenance task, but if you do it the right way, you can enjoy a nice lawn. All About Lawns gives us a few mowing tips that can help to keep the quality of your grass looking great while still saving time.

Don’t Cut Your Grass Too Short

Cutting your grass to short can help destroy it by making it vulnerable to weeds and insects. You are going to want to keep your blade sharp, too. Dull blades can destroy the grass shaft. One rule of thumb: never cut more than 1/3 of the grass height.

Cut at Appropriate Times

Spring is the time for most grass cutting, which would be about once a week, depending on your personal preferences. During warm weather, grass should be cut a few times a month. Don’t over water; it can help cut down on growth.

Leave Lawn Clippings

This is a key time saver. Don’t waste time with bagging grass. Leaving the clippings on your lawn will help nutrition of your lawn. It can also help retain water so that you don’t have to spend as much time watering it.

Zoysia: The Solution

You could maintain your lawn using the tips we just gave you, or you could invest in zoysia.

Grass maintenance for zoysia is pretty simple. You will spend less time mowing your lawn (about two-thirds less time, to be exact) because of the very nature of zoysia grass, although you do want to keep the general rule of thumb in mind. You won’t ever have to use fertilizers or pesticides, and you will rarely have to water.

Which sounds better to you?

Low Maintenance Lawns: Part II


posted on June 1st, 2010 by Steve Schug

Zoysia Low Maintenance LawnIn our last post, we let you know about some ways that a low maintenance lawn could help save you money while being environmentally friendly. Here are a few more ways that you can save a buck while helping to save the environment.

Lawn Mowing

Lawns need to be cut, which can create an entire set of environmental issues on its own. Lawn mowers can be damaging by emitting air and noise pollution. However, there are some ways to help solve this problem. Rechargeable electric mowers are definitely environmentally friendly (they are friendly to your wallet, too). These are good for lawns up to about ¾ of an acre. An area that is larger than that usually requires a gas powered tractor, which isn’t so friendly to the environment. Newer ones are more efficient and becoming less offensive, but may not be the ideal solution.

The simplest and best solution is to pick a slow growing grass, like zoysia, for your lawn. This will require less mowing, which will ultimately save you time and money while helping the environment by cutting down on emissions. You can even leave the clippings on the lawn to help turn old grass into organic material to keep moisture on your soil.

Fertilization

Another great aspect of low maintenance lawns like zoysia is that you don’t have to fertilize as often, if at all, which will ultimately mean slower growth and less cutting. It also means less potential for harsh chemicals to end up in our waterways. But if you do choose to fertilize, going organic is the best way to go about it. Having a sustainable lawn really means starting with choosing the right grass type suitable to your local conditions. It is key to understanding the characteristics of your grass so that you can know what you can do to help save time, money, and the environment. Putting in the right grass is the first step to a sustainable lawn.

Low Maintenance Lawns: Part I


posted on May 26th, 2010 by Steve Schug

GrassYou may be wondering how to grow an environmentally friendly lawn without spending a fortune. Well there are a few ways to save money while still focusing on being friendly to our earth. Here is the first part of two installments on how to keep your lawn both low maintenance and environmentally friendly.

First, it is key to understand the characteristics of any grass to determine how sustainable and beneficial it will be to the environment. All maintained grasses can provide an area that can be enjoyed by family, including pets, while still providing soil stability. But grass can do more than that.

A beautiful green lawn, with the help of trees and hedges, can help reduce the air temperature around a house by 7 to 14 degrees. That can significantly reduce the cost to air condition a home. Even more so, lawns absorb carbon, cleaning the air we breathe. Most every lawn can do this, but zoysia lawns can do it with less water, less fertilizer, less pesticide, less herbicide, and less mowing.

Zoysia is also more drought resistant, which ultimately means less watering for it to stay green, even in the heat of summer. Other grasses, which require more watering, can cause run-off of poor quality water into sewers from non-lawn and garden areas such as driveways. This can eventually reach our rivers and streams. But well maintained lawns absorb and filter water.

Even more so, Zoysia’s ability to be drought resistant means a reduction in the need for supplemental watering systems like sprinklers. Homes with thirsty grasses can sometimes use up to 85% of the total home water usage in warm summer months. That is quite a burden on the environment AND your wallet. And as water conservation becomes more and more important to a sustainable environment, lawns needing less water will provide the most environmentally friendly benefits.

To find out more about how low maintenance lawns can save you money and help the environment, check back soon for Low Maintenance Lawns: Part II.

Spring Cleaning is for Your Lawn, Too!


posted on May 12th, 2010 by Steve Schug

Lush Spring LawnSpring maintenance is important for Zoysia grass upkeep. You should remove dead leaves and other materials from the previous seasons to improve passage of air, nutrients, and water. This will help your zoysia lawn to return to its lush, green appearance after a season of dormancy.

If you have a confined turf area, you can remove this material best by setting the mower at a lower setting to cut at approximately one to two inches height and mowing the lawn in two directions (north to south and east to west). After doing this, use a spring or grass rake to remove all dead materials by vigorously raking. This will promote earlier growth by removing the shade provided by old leaf surface.

You can also use a de-thatcher as well, which will help simplify the project.

Mowing Your Zoysia Lawn


posted on May 5th, 2010 by Steve Schug

Zoysia grass is a great solution for low-maintenance lawn care. But occasional upkeep is necessary, but not difficult. Although mowing is less frequent with Zoysia, cutting your lawn can help it looking healthy and lush.

Newly Planted Plugs

It is important to give newly planted plugs the time they need to establish. With that being said, you should NOT mow newly planted plugs for at least one month. After green growth is apparent, cut the grass at your highest lawn mower setting for the first few times. Be sure to use a sharp rotary or reel mower.

Mowing Zoysia LawnEstablished Lawns

Amazoy’s slow growth rate and spreading process really helps decrease the amount of mowing you have to do. Ordinary grasses require mowing about once a week, whereas our Amazoy zoysia requires about once a month, if that!

But when you do have to mow, there aren’t any secret tricks. While Amazoy can be cut below one inch, the mowing height of two to three inches is much preferred, and ensuring that the blade is sharp will make a lawn look its best. A good rule of thumb is to never remove more than one-third of the leaf blade.

Zoysia’s low maintenance upkeep allows you more time to enjoy your lawn and less time working on it.

Zoysia: Fertilizing New Plugs


posted on April 27th, 2010 by Steve Schug

Amazoy Zoysia is known to grow in virtually any soil: clay, salty, sandy, and even rocky soils. So no matter what kind of soil is under your grass, it is pretty likely that zoysia will grow. But any grass can do with a little nourishment. If you are looking to speed up the process of plug establishment, fertilizer is a great place to start.

Fertilizing Zoysia PlugsIf you do decide that fertilizer is for you, one very important rule is be sure to NOT use granular fertilizers. These can be hazardous to your plugs and can destroy an established zoysia lawn. Using a water-soluble fertilizer, like Nutri-20, is the way to go. These types are better suited for zoysia grass and will help nourish them in the right ways. You can even use it for your garden; water-soluble fertilizers do wonders for vegetables, flowers, and shrubs, too.

Planting Zoysia Grass Plugs


posted on April 20th, 2010 by Steve Schug

Once you have ordered and received your Amazoy Zoysia grass plugs, your next step is actual planting. And with over five decades of experience in harvesting, packaging, delivery, and planting, we have this planting process down to a science. Before you begin planting, there are a few things to think about.

First, be sure it is the right time of year for you to plant. Zoysia can be planted throughout the spring, summer, and fall, but check out our map to see when is the premium season for your region. Next, you must finish separating the plugs with shears. This is because in our attempt to ensure maximum freshness for you, the plugs are not cut entirely through before shipment.

Finally, you must have a planting plan. Using our example diagram, plan where you are going to place your zoysia plugs. Holes should be made no more than a foot apart. If you want your new lawn to fill in more quickly, you can plant your plugs closer together (half a foot apart). When you are finally ready to put the plugs into the ground, consult the planting instructions that come with each order. But just in case you misplace them, you can follow the steps below.

Planting Instructions

1. Mow your existing lawn as low as possible.
2. Ensure that your ground is workable and moist enough for planting.
3. Once you have determined a starting point, insert the plugger into the ground to remove established grass. You can also drill a hole, depending on the tool you are using. Now you will have a hole for your plugs.
4. Put the zoysia plug in the hole you just created, filling in around the edges with loose soil. Make sure to only bury the roots, as the living plant needs sunlight to grow.
5. Lightly compress the plug into the ground with the heel of your foot or hand.
6. Water LIGHTLY.

To see the proper way to plant, check out this video:

Got Bugs?


posted on April 12th, 2010 by Steve Schug

Luckily, because of the nature of our Amazoy Zoysia, insects and pests are not as common a problem as with regular grasses. Established Amazoy is pretty resistant to most pests and the threat they may hold to grass.

However, there are some exceptions. Amazoy is not resistant to grubs, mole crickets, cinch bugs, and nematodes, especially newly planted plugs. If you have experienced any of these pests, we recommend that you treat for these before planting your plugs. If you don’t, these aggressive pests may eat the tender roots of your new Amazoy Zoysia grass.

If for some reason, insects present a problem after your grass has been established, no need to worry. Zoysia is good at resisting injury from most chemicals when pest problems arise.