Archive for the ‘ mowing ’ Category

Can Zoysia Overtake My Lawn?


posted on October 3rd, 2017 by

Bahia Grass

Because Zoysia is a spreading grass, it is known to overtake other grasses and weeds in all types of soil conditions. Overtime, we have researched exactly which types our customers are working with to determine if Zoysia is able to overtake their lawns. Below, we have created a list of the common grasses that Zoysia will take over. There are many more grasses that Zoysia can beat out, but here are just a few.

  • Bahia- This grass has a coarse blade and requires frequent mowing during hot weather. This grass does not do well on sandy embankments, whereas Zoysia thrives. Also, grassy weeds in Bahia grass can be difficult to get rid of.

    Bermuda Grass

  • Bermuda- This grass has a medium texture and turns brown with the first drop in temperature. Zoysia does not go dormant until after the first hard frost of the year. Also, once Bermuda grass is established, it is very hard to get rid of and actually grows flat. It also does not grow well in shady areas and needs to be watered weekly.

    Centipede Grass

  • Centipede- Due to severe iron deficiencies in the soil, this grass cannot grow in the western US; it thrives in moderately acidic soils. Hard freezes can kill the leaves of this grass, so it does not do well in areas that have intense winters. Also, this grass is very slow-growing and is not very salt tolerant. Zoysia is much better in these situations.

    St. Augustine Grass

  • St. Augustine- This grass does not tolerate a lot of traffic. It is a big thatch producer and requires much moisture. Because it is so aggressive, it must be mowed frequently to keep it under control. It cannot thrive in areas where temperatures dip below ten degrees for several hours. Zoysia is preferable because it requires so little water, less mowing, and is more cold tolerant.

    Kentucky Bluegrass

  • Kentucky Bluegrass– This grass will go dormant in hot, dry weather as well as during the cold winter months. It does very poorly in shaded areas and requires frequent watering to survive. Zoysia really thrives in hot and dry conditions and will remain green during summer heat.

    Rye grass

  • Rye– Annual varieties of this grass can’t be used as a permanent grass so it is generally used only for over-seeding your current lawn. It prefers cool environments where conditions are not too extreme. It requires very frequent watering as well.

 

Amazoy Meyer Zoysia can outdo almost every type of grass in most any situation. The grasses above are only a few of the common grasses that Zoysia can overtake. You can always take a sample of your lawn to a local nursery to determine what type of grass you have if you are unsure. Zoysia is a warm season grass and does go dormant during the winter months in northern states. Keep in mind that Zoysia is very slow-growing, so it can take about 2-3 years to completely take over these other grasses. The benefits though last for a lifetime.

Why Pick Zoysia?


posted on March 15th, 2017 by

Zoysia is a very hardy and drought-resistant grass. It grows well in a variety of conditions and is lush and carpet-like when fully established. When Herbert Friedberg launched Amazoy Zoysia, he knew that this grass would be the answer for America’s lawns, and we are here today to explain why Zoysia is a great choice to achieve the most beautiful lawn.

Drought-Resistant & Slow-Growing– To start off, Zoysia is a very drought-resistant grass and thrives on heat. It withstands temperatures as high as 120 degrees in summer and as low as -30 degrees in winter. When planting, you must only water the grass once a day (a light mist) for the first 3 weeks. After the first 3 weeks, you actually stop watering completely and let the heat take over. This cuts water bills tremendously. Because Zoysia is a slow-growing grass as well, it cuts down mowing by about 2/3. Most Zoysia customers mow once for every 3 times they’ve mowed other grasses.

Chokes out Summer Weeds & Insects– Zoysia is a very hardy grass, and it grows differently than most grasses. It spreads by stolons that expand sideways more than they grow tall causing the grass to have a very strong root system. Because of this, the grass will grow thick and carpet-like. Weeds cannot hold up to the thickness of our Zoysia grass. Zoysia will choke out most of the peskiest weeds and insects. This comes naturally for the grass, so this reduces your family’s risk of being exposed to weed killers and pesticides as well. Overall, Zoysia can heal itself from most common lawn issues.

Grows in Most Soils & on Slopes– Our Amazoy Meyer Zoysia grows in all different types of soils. It does well in clay, salty, sandy, and rock-like soils. If you feel that your soil is too rocky, you can always mix top soil in the same hole when planting a plug. Remember to never put top soil on top of the plugs after planting because this will block oxygen and sunlight from entering the plants. Because Zoysia grows in most soils, it does well in areas that other grasses may not thrive in. Amazoy Meyer is great to use on slopes, play areas, and bare spots.

In conclusion, Zoysia can solve almost every homeowner’s problem when it comes to achieving a perfect lawn. Not only does it grow in most areas, but it also helps you save money in numerous ways. Once established, Zoysia will last a lifetime giving you a beautiful lawn.

Are Weeds Invading Your Lawn?


posted on February 28th, 2017 by

All gardeners know that weeds can become a great hassle for newly-planted grasses. Some or all of these weeds can find their way into existing Zoysia lawns sometimes even before it comes out of dormancy. When the Zoysia does come up, it will start to crowd out these weeds. Regularly mowing your lawn can eliminate some of these issues. Below, we have provided a list of common weeds with a picture and short description to help you identify what is invading your lawn.

Crabgrass

Summer Annual Weeds (Warm Seasons):

  • Crabgrass- Seeds germinate from spring to late summer. Mowing the lawn too short can cause this to thrive. It also thrives along the edges of hot surfaces such as driveways and sidewalks. It is known to survive until the first frost of the year.

    Dandelion

  • Dandelion- This is one of the first plants to bloom in spring and continues to grow all summer long. They can be found almost everywhere, but especially in open ground, disturbed soil, and gardens. They can also be used as a food source if nothing else works.

    Black Medic

  • Black Medic- This weed grows between June and August. It colonizes dry, infertile spots where little else will grow. Plants stay close to the ground until flowers bloom.

    Ground Ivy

  • Ground Ivy– It grows in a sprawling carpet-like mass, putting down roots as it creeps along horizontally. It goes by many names such as Creeping Charlie and Cat’s Foot. Because it grows best in semi-shaded areas and wetlands, ground ivy is not usually an issue in Zoysia. It may come out at certain times of the year in Zoysia whenever a specific area is getting shadier or wetter than usual.

    Wild Violet

  • Wild Violet– Violets bloom between March and May. They normally prefer cooler weather.

 

Winter Annual Weeds (Cool Seasons):

Common Chickweed

These weeds normally come up whenever Zoysia enters dormancy. Because the Zoysia is not active at that time, the weeds are able to occupy that area for the time being. When the Zoysia springs back up, it will overtake these weeds.

 

  • Common Chickweed- Seeds germinate from late fall to early spring. It thrives in cool, moist weather. It disappears under high temperature stress.

    White Clover

  • White Clover- It grows best during cool, moist weather on well-drained, fertile soils. White clover propagates by seed or creeping stolons which root at the nodes. They are especially difficult to get rid of.

    Buttercup

  • Buttercup- Reproduction is normally seeds. The plant can be very difficult to control due to its long spidery roots that can re-sprout a new plant if left in the ground. It grows in woodland beds and borders in shade.

    Spurweed

  • Spurweed- Spurweed becomes a major problem in the landscape in mid-late spring when it flowers and sets fruit that are surrounded by razor sharp spines. There is little that can be done once it has flowered and produced its spines. These weeds should be eliminated with an herbicide if noticed.

    Field Pennycress

  • Field Pennycress- Field pennycress may produce from 1600 to 15,000 seeds that scatter readily.

 

While Zoysia is great at crowding out most summer weeds, it cannot prevent all weeds from getting started. Millions of weed seeds are blown from other lawns and forest areas every year. A few are bound to find some soil in which to start growing. Keeping your lawn mowed regularly will help you control these weeds and have a healthier lawn. Organic and non-organic weed killers can be used as well.

Zoysia Grass In The Fall


posted on October 6th, 2015 by

fall leaves

 

There may be changes in your Zoysia lawn with the approaching colder weather. As the ground temperatures slowly drop or we get a hard frost, zoysia grass will start to go into its dormant state. When this happens the grass may start to turn yellowish and eventually a complete tawny brown. It is often thought that the grass is actually dying, however it is not, the grass is only going to sleep because of the colder weather upon us. This is how Zoysia grass protects itself from the winter elements and cold temperatures.

Many of us are preparing for our final grass cutting for the year. It is best to mow your Zoysia lawn about 1 ½ to 2 ½ inches in height, this should keep your lawn looking well manicured during the winter months.

Once that final cut is done, it is a great time for aerating your lawn, while the soil is soft and moist. Check out our post on September 4, 2015 “Aerating a Lawn” for more information on aerating.

Then just sit back and enjoy the change in the seasons, the turning of the leaves, colder weather and snow falling.

When winter has passed and spring has arrived, your zoysia grass will start to come out of dormancy. Once the temperatures maintain around 70 degrees or higher you will start to see new green blades of grass growing from your lawn. In no time at all you will have your beautiful zoysia lawn back.

Final Fall Chores for Your Zoysia Lawn


posted on October 4th, 2013 by

It is fall already, where did the summer go?  As we start to approach the cooler weather our lawn chores, at least if you have a zoysia lawn, becomes much less. This is the time of the year you can enjoy some outside activities or just sit back and relax! This is one of the great advantages of having zoysia grass. 

If you live in an area where the temperatures get cold, over the next few weeks you will be doing your final mowing for this year.  After the final mowing and the weather gets cold enough, zoysia will go dormant, turning a tawny brown color.  But, you will not have to worry about the looks of your zoysia lawn over the months ahead, it will keep a very manicured look and be worry free! 

To have and keep a beautiful zoysia lawn, there are a few steps you should take before the grass goes dormant.  It is a good practice to fertilize your established lawn in the early fall in advance of any frost.  If you have not fertilized and it is still early enough, you may want to apply a water soluble fertilizer, such as our Nutri 20. Please do not use granular fertilizer, some of them can destroy zoysia grass.  Remember to always read the label before applying anything to your lawn to ensure the product is safe for zoysia grass.  

This is the time of year you would also apply a pre-emergent to kill the weed seeds that are already in the ground for the spring weeds.  Appling a pre-emergent now will save a lot of time in the spring and summer and prevent most of the spring weeds from ever germinating and growing. 

After these task are completed, sit back and enjoy the rest of the fall and winter months, you are finished with your zoysia lawn tasks until the spring!

Different types of Zoysia Grass


posted on February 15th, 2013 by

 ZoysiaLawn

Many people do not realize that there are numerous strains of zoysia grass, all are a little different.   Below are a few of the commonly used strains of zoysia to show you how they are different. Let’s start with Amazoy our name for Meyers, Z-52 the original zoysia grass.

Amazoy – Medium leaf blade, deep green color, very tight growth pattern, low maintenance, drought resistance, moderate shade tolerance and very cold tolerant but will not suffer winter damage from cold. Is usually planted as plugs, can be laid as sod.

Emerald – Fine leaf blade, dark green color, tight growth pattern, high maintenance, drought resistance, moderate shade tolerance and warm weather only, cold weather can damage it, is usually planted professionally as sod, can be planted as plugs.

Zenith – Medium leaf blade, deep green color, tight growth pattern, drought resistant, average maintenance, moderate shade tolerance, good cold tolerance, usually planted by seed (recommended to be done by professionals) can be planted by plugs.

Let’s compare, Amazoy has a medium leaf blade, grows very tight (crowds out weeds the best), giving it the feel of walking on a deep carpet, low maintenance. Only needs mowing a few times during the season; Amazoy is very drought resistant, therefore requires less watering. Amazoy will grow in partial shade and can withstand cold temperatures, up to 30 below.

Emerald has a fine leaf, tight growth pattern, (not as tight as Amazoy), requires high maintenance. It requires about 1 ½ inches of water a week and mowing about every 7 to 10 days, will grow in partial shade, but only grows well in warm weather.

Zenith has a medium blade, tight growth pattern, drought resistant and is fairly cold tolerant.  Zenith is usually planted from seed however you must have a bare seedbed, if planted within an existing lawn there is a high failure rate.  Can only be planted from spring to early summer and must be kept moist at least 15 to 25 days and then watered at least once a day for the next 8 to 10 weeks.  Seeding is recommended for professionals only.

Choosing a Grass


posted on February 1st, 2013 by

                                    

               What is the right grass for you? 

With so many different types of grasses available, how do you know what grass is right for you?  There are several different aspects you will need to consider.  First you need to decide what kind of grass you are going to plant, fescue, rye, Bermuda, St. Augustine, zoysia, etc.  Be sure to check on the different strains the grasses have, each one is a little different.   

It is best to look at the main characteristic such as, how is the grass planted; seed, plugs, sod, etc.  Consider what you want from your grass, such as color, maintenance, water requirements, growth pattern, blade size, dormancy, reproduction and durability as well as cost.

It is important to check all of these aspects of the grass. 

  • Color – Some are a light green, deep green, dark green, blue green, etc.
  • Maintenance – How much is required? How frequent does the lawn need to be mowed, watered, fertilized, weed control applied, etc.
  • Watering requirements – Is the grass drought resistant?  Does your area have water restrictions?  What is the average amount of water the grass requires?
  • Blade Size and texture – Do you want a thin blade, medium blade or wide blade? Do you want a grass that feels course, soft grass or a grass that feels like carpet?
  • Growth pattern –  Is the grass a spreading grass or does it need to be reseeded each year?  
  • Seasons – Do you want a grass that will stay green all summer, then you want a “warm” weather grass. Do you want a cold weather grass that can brown out in summer during extreme heat but stays green in the winter?
  • Durability – How much wear and tear can the grass tolerant? Will it hold up to children and pets?
  • Slopes – Do you want a grass with low maintenance and good erosion control or seed the area and hope the seeds take before washing away?

 There is a lot to consider and research, however remember your lawn is something you will want to enjoy for a long, long time. The right decision can make a huge difference!

Grasscycling


posted on October 14th, 2010 by

Grasscycling is a simple and “green” way to nourish your Zoysia lawn. This process is the natural recycling of grass by leaving clippings on the lawn when mowing. Grass clippings quickly decompose, returning valuable nutrients to the soil to nourish your Zoysia lawn.

Advantages of Grasscycling

– No bagging or raking of the lawn required.

– Plastic bags full of lawn clippings don’t end up in the landfill.

– Clippings help your Zoysia lawn reach its fertilizing needs, reducing both time and money spent fertilizing.

– Grasscycling reduces the need for fertilizer, pesticides and herbicides, reducing pollution to the environment and chemicals in your yard.

– Does not cause thatch, making your lawn more durable.

How to Grasscycle Effectively

– Cut up to 1/3 of the leaf surface while mowing, but no more.

– Mow when the lawn is dry.

– Mow using a sharp mower blade. Dull blades bruise and tear at grass, leading to a ragged tip on the top of the blade.

– Aerate your lawn. This will open up the soil and increase the movement of water, fertilizer, and air by speeding up decomposition of the grass clippings and enhancing deep root growth.

– Water when necessary.

– Follow the lawn care schedule for your type of Zoysia grass.

Grasscycling is environmentally responsible, and an opportunity for homeowners to reduce their waste while saving both time and energy. For more information about what you can do to protect the environment while caring for your Zoysia lawn, learn about organic lawn care.

Caring for Your Zoysia Lawn: The Fall Season


posted on September 15th, 2010 by

As the temperature gets cooler and we get closer to the fall season, it’s important to continue caring for your Zoysia lawn. Using these techniques to maintain your grass will get you the best results throughout all seasons of the year.

Mow – During the spring and summer, Zoysia should be cut at the lower setting on your mower to remove dead leaf tissue. By September, this is unnecessary and the mower blade height should be raised by 1/2 to 1 inch for fall.

Aerate Your Lawn – To keep your Zoysia grass healthy, you should aerate your lawn each spring and fall. This helps prevent compaction of the soil and aids in preventing and removing thatch problems.

Dethatch – Zoysia grass can accumulate thatch because of its tough stem tissue. Thatch is a layer of partially decomposed plant material that builds up on the soil’s surface. Dethatching helps keeps the turf healthy by moving excess vegetation from the thatch layer.

Avoid Fertilization – Fertilizing your lawn in the fall (after August) may interfere with the natural hardening process which takes place before winter. Instead of fertilizing, leave your Zoysia in its natural state of preparation for the winter dormant period.

Zoysia responds dramatically well when treated with the right care. By following the plan for watering, fertilizing, mowing, weeding, and maintaining a clean lawn, your Zoysia will develop into a beautiful and inviting thick lawn.

Read more about care and maintenance for your Zoysia lawn.

Organic Lawn Care


posted on July 7th, 2010 by

As we learn more and more about how to best take care of the earth around us, here are a few tips on how to make lawn care more eco-friendly.

Water

Most grasses only require an inch of water per week, and with zoysia grass, that is even less. Be wary of how much you are watering; too much can be bad for your lawn and your wallet.

To give the grass the water it needs, water in the early morning or evening so that less evaporation occurs. Also, think about using rain barrels to reduce dependence on your town or city’s water source. It can also save you money.

Mowers

While electric mowers can save gas emissions, they still use up energy resources. Try using a reel mower. While older reel mowers might have a bad reputation, newer reel mowers have sharp blades and cut just as well as electric

Clippings

Next time you think to buy fertilizer for your lawn, consider leaving lawn clippings. Lawn clippings can provide as a great natural fertilizer and don’t cause thatch buildup.

Nutrients

When adding nutrient to alter your soil, make sure that you are using organic products like organic lime or elemental sulfur. This will help your soil absorb sunlight and water the appropriate way, ultimately conserving resources.