Archive for the ‘ Planting ’ Category

Which one is right for me? One inch plugs, 3×3 inch super plugs for sod?


posted on July 24th, 2015 by

In the long run planting living zoysia is always more successful than planting zoysia from seed.  Now you have options on which size living plant to use, 1 inch, 3×3 inch super plugs or sod. What is the difference between these? The difference lies in the time, effort, money and how soon you want a full zoysia lawn.  The same Amazoy zoysia grass is used One Inch Plugin all of these methods.

One inch plugs are the most cost efficient way to go and best for larger areas.  With these plugs you do have to finish separating the plugs which adds an additional step when planting.  Planting one inch plugs takes more time and longer for your lawn to fill in when planted 12 inches apart.

3x3 Inch Super PlugThe Super Plug, the three by three inch plug, is a better way to plant, however it is not as economical as the smaller plugs.  The 3 inch x 3 inch plugs cut down on the time and effort in planting the plugs. The Super Plugs come already cut into 3 inch x 3 inch squares.  All you have to do is take them out of the tray and place them right in the hole you have made, fill in around the roots, step on the plug and water.

Sod is great for an instant lawn, however it can be expensive to Sodcover your lawn in sod.  You would also need a completely clear soil bed to lay the sod.

No matter which way you decide to plant your zoysia lawn, all will provide a beautiful, full, thick carpet of Amazoy zoysia grass for decades to come.

What Are These Vines Growing In My Zoysia Grass:?


posted on June 23rd, 2015 by

runner white backgroundIf you have a Zoysia lawn this is what you want to see! These vines are called stolons. Please do not cut or pull them out! This is one of the ways this type of grass spreads and fills in.

The stolon, often called a “runner”, is growing from the main plant. About every inch on the runner there is a small cluster. These clusters will eventually take a roothold and start to produce another plant. When the stolons finally come into contact with other stolons they will fill in the lawn making the grass thicker and hand holding runnerfuller.

If the runners start to invade an area you do not want grass, such as, trying to grow over your sidewalk, driveway or in your flower bed, then you would need to trim or cut them. The cut stolon can even be replant in other areas you may want to add more grass too. Be sure the soil is loosened when replanting the runners and the little clusters are making contact with the soil. The runner will eventually take a roothold and start forming new plants.

The Anatomy of A Zoysia Grass Plant


posted on December 4th, 2014 by

zoysia plant

Understanding how your Zoysia grows and spreads can help you to maintain and care for your lawn properly.

There are several parts to a zoysia plant. I am going to touch on some of the main parts, the crown, roots, rhizome, stolons, leaf blade and seedhead.

The crown is the main shaft of the plant which is attached to the tap roots. The tap roots can grow up to 2 feet long. The tap root is where the plant absorbs water under ground. Due to the long length of this root it can reach a lot of water that other grasses can not.

The crown also produces Rhizomes, which are roots that are underground about 4-5 inches and grow outward and upward, producing new plants. This is how the grass spreads underground.

From the crown stolons also form and run along the top of the soil. About every inch there is a small cluster, called a node. This node will eventually take a roothold forming a new plant. The stolons are how zoysia grass spreads above ground.

Most importantly, water, sunlight and nutrients are absorbed through the leaf blade and soil. These are past from the leaf blade down to the roots of the plant and then fed to the rest of the plant.

The seedhead usually does not grow if the grass is kept mowed. The seeds that are produced on most zoysia grasses are not used to propagate zoysia. The success rate is very low if at all. Successful zoysia lawns are most often grown from plugs, sprigs or sod.

Brown Grass in the Summer or Brown Grass in the Winter?


posted on September 25th, 2014 by

 

OR ZOYSIA DURING HOT DRY SUMMERS

                 OR                  ZOYSIA DURING HOT DRY SUMMERS

COOL SEASON GRASS DURING DRY HOT SUMMERS

COOL SEASON GRASS DURING DRY HOT SUMMERS

This is a decision that has to be made when choosing what type of grass you want for your lawn. Someone once said, “No matter what type of grass you have you will have a brown lawn at some point of the year.” Why does the grass go brown? Depending on the type of grass you have would determine when and why it turns brown.

Zoysia is a warm weather grass.  As a way to protect itself from the cold temperatures Zoysia goes dormant (to sleep) for the winter. When the grass is dormant it turns a light honey brown color, it is not dead. When dormant the grass does not require any type of care or maintenance. It will keep its well manicured look, since it does stop growing during this time.  Not all zoysia grasses  can withstand the colder climates. Amazoy zoysia is the most cold tolerant of all of the zoysia grasses, it can withstand temperatures to 30 below zero.

On the other hand, cool weather grasses do not go dormant in the winter, however many do go dormant in the hot dry summer months. These grasses turn brown and even die when the temperatures get really hot. The only way to keep them green is to water, water and water the lawn! Extra watering is becoming more difficult to do because of the droughts, cost of water, watering restrictions, well limitations and the time it takes to stay on schedule.

Do I want my grass to be green in the winter months, when it is not used much and in some areas covered with snow? Or, do I want my grass to be green and lush in the summer months when it is used the most?

If you want green grass in the summer then you want a warm weather grass like Amazoy zoysia grass!

Most Common Suspects When Zoysia Plugs Don’t Grow


posted on March 11th, 2014 by

                  

Why didn’t my plugs work, it says they will grow anywhere?  When this question is asked we play detective to find the reason why.   CSI Zoysia has a list of suspects, let’s investigate.

Suspect #1 – Left in the Box

Plant the plugs as soon as you can.  If you cannot plant right away, that’s fine but the plugs must be taken out of the box, laid grass side up, kept out of the direct sunlight and sprinkled daily.  The plugs can actually survive 2 to 3 weeds before planting if these steps are followed.  Do not leave the grass in the box!

Suspect #2 – Gets Enough Sun

Before planting the grass check out the area and make sure it gets at least 2 to 3 hours of direct sunlight a day or the plugs will not grow well.

Suspect #3 – Not Following Label Instructions

By not stopping and reading the label of products applied to your lawn, such as weed killers, fertilizers, etc you could end up with dead plugs.  You want to check and be sure it is safe for zoysia grass, follow their recommend applications and waiting period before planting.

Suspect #4 – Too Much Water

Over watering is the Prime Suspect for the plugs to fail.  Amazoy zoysia is very drought resistant, too much water can damage its root system. When first planted the plugs do need to be watered daily but only about 10 to 15 minutes once a day, for the first three weeks.  Do not over water the plugs, this can kill them. 

Suspect #5 – Covering the Plugs

Do not cover the entire plug. Only cover the roots of the plugs, leaving the blades above ground level.   After covering the roots step on the plug firmly to eliminate any air pockets.

Suspect # 6 – Too Many Weeds

Until the plugs have completely filled in, they still need help with weed control. If you let the weeds take over, they can choke out the plugs.  Once the plugs are established, they will choke out most summer weeds.

Making sure none of these suspects are threats to your plugs, you should start to see new green blades of grass growing from each plug and you are on your way to a beautiful zoysia lawn!

When Is The Best Time To Plant Zoysia?


posted on January 14th, 2014 by

                                     When Is The Best Time To Plant Zoysia?

Everyone knows fall is a great time to plant grass.  No, I hear spring is the best and we all know you don’t plant during the hot summer months. Wait a minute this is Amazoy zoysia grass plugs!

The planting time for zoysia grass plugs is not the same as a lot of other types of grasses. Zoysia is one of the few grass that can be planted through the heat of summer.  Zoysia loves the dry warm weather.

The best planting time is from early March to late September.  Even though some states have milder temperatures than others, it is best not to plant in the late fall or winter months.  With the changing weather patterns, you never know when you may get hit with a frost or cold weather that could harm newly planted plugs. 

 To make sure you are receiving quality plugs and they will be successful, our plugs are only shipped when the local planting times are best.

You can start to plant the plugs once you are past the threat of snow, ice or freezing temperatures and your ground is workable (thawed).  You can continue to plant as long as the plugs are planted at least 45 days before the first hard fall frost. Yes, you can plant all summer long as long as you follow the watering instructions.  The plugs need 10 to 15 minutes once a day for the first three weeks.  After that you should only water if you are having drought type conditions, then no more than 2 to 3 times a week, again only for 10 to 15 minutes.

The sooner you get your plugs planted the sooner you will be on your way to a beautiful Amazoy zoysia lawn.

How Many Plugs Do I Need


posted on February 25th, 2013 by

How Many Plugs Should One Buy?

When you are ready to start your Amazoy zoysia lawn, the first thing you need to do is measure the area for the square footage. Following the steps below will assist you in calculating how many plugs you will need.  We recommend 2 plugs per every square foot.  Planting at this rate it will take about 1 to 1 1/2 seasons (years) for your zoysia plugs to completely fill in. You can increase or decrease the number of plugs per square foot, however this will alter the fill in time.

To determine the total number of plugs required, measure the length and width of the area to be covered. There is no need to be exact, getting the approximate length by width and adding a bit to both will ensure you order enough plugs.  It may make it easier if you break the area down in sections, for example if you are planting your entire lawn your backyard would be one section, side lawn would be the second section and front lawn would be the third section.

Once you have the measurements, enter them in our plug calculator and it will determine the number of plugs you need whether you are planting one plug every square foot or up to 4 plugs per square foot. The calculator will help figure out how many plugs you need if your lawn is circular, triangular, or free-form in shape, just break these areas down into smaller blocks.  You can enter up to eight areas on the calculator at one time.

Different types of Zoysia Grass


posted on February 15th, 2013 by

 ZoysiaLawn

Many people do not realize that there are numerous strains of zoysia grass, all are a little different.   Below are a few of the commonly used strains of zoysia to show you how they are different. Let’s start with Amazoy our name for Meyers, Z-52 the original zoysia grass.

Amazoy – Medium leaf blade, deep green color, very tight growth pattern, low maintenance, drought resistance, moderate shade tolerance and very cold tolerant but will not suffer winter damage from cold. Is usually planted as plugs, can be laid as sod.

Emerald – Fine leaf blade, dark green color, tight growth pattern, high maintenance, drought resistance, moderate shade tolerance and warm weather only, cold weather can damage it, is usually planted professionally as sod, can be planted as plugs.

Zenith – Medium leaf blade, deep green color, tight growth pattern, drought resistant, average maintenance, moderate shade tolerance, good cold tolerance, usually planted by seed (recommended to be done by professionals) can be planted by plugs.

Let’s compare, Amazoy has a medium leaf blade, grows very tight (crowds out weeds the best), giving it the feel of walking on a deep carpet, low maintenance. Only needs mowing a few times during the season; Amazoy is very drought resistant, therefore requires less watering. Amazoy will grow in partial shade and can withstand cold temperatures, up to 30 below.

Emerald has a fine leaf, tight growth pattern, (not as tight as Amazoy), requires high maintenance. It requires about 1 ½ inches of water a week and mowing about every 7 to 10 days, will grow in partial shade, but only grows well in warm weather.

Zenith has a medium blade, tight growth pattern, drought resistant and is fairly cold tolerant.  Zenith is usually planted from seed however you must have a bare seedbed, if planted within an existing lawn there is a high failure rate.  Can only be planted from spring to early summer and must be kept moist at least 15 to 25 days and then watered at least once a day for the next 8 to 10 weeks.  Seeding is recommended for professionals only.

Choosing a Grass


posted on February 1st, 2013 by

                                    

               What is the right grass for you? 

With so many different types of grasses available, how do you know what grass is right for you?  There are several different aspects you will need to consider.  First you need to decide what kind of grass you are going to plant, fescue, rye, Bermuda, St. Augustine, zoysia, etc.  Be sure to check on the different strains the grasses have, each one is a little different.   

It is best to look at the main characteristic such as, how is the grass planted; seed, plugs, sod, etc.  Consider what you want from your grass, such as color, maintenance, water requirements, growth pattern, blade size, dormancy, reproduction and durability as well as cost.

It is important to check all of these aspects of the grass. 

  • Color – Some are a light green, deep green, dark green, blue green, etc.
  • Maintenance – How much is required? How frequent does the lawn need to be mowed, watered, fertilized, weed control applied, etc.
  • Watering requirements – Is the grass drought resistant?  Does your area have water restrictions?  What is the average amount of water the grass requires?
  • Blade Size and texture – Do you want a thin blade, medium blade or wide blade? Do you want a grass that feels course, soft grass or a grass that feels like carpet?
  • Growth pattern –  Is the grass a spreading grass or does it need to be reseeded each year?  
  • Seasons – Do you want a grass that will stay green all summer, then you want a “warm” weather grass. Do you want a cold weather grass that can brown out in summer during extreme heat but stays green in the winter?
  • Durability – How much wear and tear can the grass tolerant? Will it hold up to children and pets?
  • Slopes – Do you want a grass with low maintenance and good erosion control or seed the area and hope the seeds take before washing away?

 There is a lot to consider and research, however remember your lawn is something you will want to enjoy for a long, long time. The right decision can make a huge difference!

Composting


posted on May 8th, 2012 by

Composting is the natural process that turns organic material like leaves, grass clippings and twigs into a dark rich substance that is fantastic for lawns and gardens. By adding compost to your Zoysia lawn, it will help the grass grow in thicker and healthier. This is because an organic matter in the compost helps soil retain nutrients and water.

Uses of Compost

– soil conditioning

– lawn dressing

– erosion control

– a potting soil component

– mulching

Benefits of Compost

As opposed to some fertilizers, composting won’t burn your grass if you accidentally use too much and it won’t stain your walkways or concrete patios around your lawn. It is also prone to show results quickly.

Placing Compost on Your Zoysia Lawn

Compost can be used as a natural fertilizer for planting new lawns or for maintaining your existing lawn.

When distributing compost across bare ground for a new lawn, be sure to use a generous amount. Mix 4 to 6 inches of compost into the soil. Once the grass plugs are planted, thoroughly water the area.

When distributing compost across your existing lawn, place piles of a shovel-full throughout your lawn about one foot apart. Using a rake spread the compost throughout the lawn until the compost is in a thin layer about ¼ to ½  inch thick. A thin layer of compost will break down quickly, releasing nutrients into the lawn without smothering your grass. After the compost is distributed, water your lawn well.

Compost works as a conditioner to your lawn, keeping it healthy and green. It is safe, organic, and with just 1 – 2 applications per year it can make a significant positive impact on your lawn’s health. Interested in composting? Read more about how to create compost from grass clippings to use on your Zoysia lawn.