Archive for the ‘ Zoysia ’ Category

Fall Pre-emergent Weed Control


posted on August 29th, 2013 by

Don’t attack the weed, kill the seed. A pre-emergent weed killer applied in the spring and fall will help eliminate most weeds before the weed emerges by killing the weed seeds.  

Fall weed controls the winter annuals which germinate in autumn or winter, then bloom in winter or spring. Some of the most common winter annuals are chickweed, deadnettle, hairy bittercress, wild mustard, prickly lettuce, annual bluegrass, etc.

You would need to know what type of weed(s) you want to eliminate in order to pick a product that is going to be effective on your weed(s). There are 2 types of weeds leaves broadleaf and grassy; the same herbicide may not be effective on both types of weeds.  It would be best if you check with your local nursery and inquire what type of weed control is recommended. If you are using an organic product such as our Gluten-8, it can be applied to any type of grass and used in any state.

Many weed killers may have a specific timing or temperature requirements.   Fall weed control is usually done in early October.It is also very important to know what type of grass you have, not every product is safe for all types of grasses. 

Remember, to read the entire label of whatever product you choose and follow the instructions for applying. Do not increase the recommended dosage, thinking this will help to kill more of the weeds or kill them quicker.  Instead you could end up killing your lawn.

Zoysia in Summer Heat


posted on July 10th, 2013 by

                                           Zoysia in Summer Heat 

Looks like we may be in for another hot summer! With the temperatures reaching the 90’s and even into the 100’s it is hard to keep your grass green unless you have an Amazoy zoysia lawn. Zoysia grass loves the sunshine and heat, withstanding temperatures up to 120 degrees.  When your neighbor’s lawns are turning brown because of the heat, your zoysia will retain its lush green color. 

If you are lucky enough to have an Amazoy zoysia lawn, you know that it is very drought tolerant and stands up to the heat.  Please remember zoysia is a living thing and needs some watering in drought type conditions.  

What are drought type conditions?  This is when you have not had any rain for at least a week, your temperatures are above 90 degrees and your ground is dried out and depending on the type of soil you have even cracking.  The grass blades of the zoysia may also start to curl, this is called penciling.  These are signs that it is time to water your zoysia lawn.  Watering for about 10 to 15 minutes 2 to 3 times a week during drought conditions should be plenty for your zoysia lawn to stay healthy and green.  

During extremely warm temperatures, do not use fertilizers, insect or weed control products on your lawn.  These treatments in the extreme heat usually are not effective and can even burn your lawn.  It is best to apply theses products when your temperatures are in the low 80’s and never in the heat of the day.

How Many Plugs Do I Need


posted on February 25th, 2013 by

How Many Plugs Should One Buy?

When you are ready to start your Amazoy zoysia lawn, the first thing you need to do is measure the area for the square footage. Following the steps below will assist you in calculating how many plugs you will need.  We recommend 2 plugs per every square foot.  Planting at this rate it will take about 1 to 1 1/2 seasons (years) for your zoysia plugs to completely fill in. You can increase or decrease the number of plugs per square foot, however this will alter the fill in time.

To determine the total number of plugs required, measure the length and width of the area to be covered. There is no need to be exact, getting the approximate length by width and adding a bit to both will ensure you order enough plugs.  It may make it easier if you break the area down in sections, for example if you are planting your entire lawn your backyard would be one section, side lawn would be the second section and front lawn would be the third section.

Once you have the measurements, enter them in our plug calculator and it will determine the number of plugs you need whether you are planting one plug every square foot or up to 4 plugs per square foot. The calculator will help figure out how many plugs you need if your lawn is circular, triangular, or free-form in shape, just break these areas down into smaller blocks.  You can enter up to eight areas on the calculator at one time.

Different types of Zoysia Grass


posted on February 15th, 2013 by

 ZoysiaLawn

Many people do not realize that there are numerous strains of zoysia grass, all are a little different.   Below are a few of the commonly used strains of zoysia to show you how they are different. Let’s start with Amazoy our name for Meyers, Z-52 the original zoysia grass.

Amazoy – Medium leaf blade, deep green color, very tight growth pattern, low maintenance, drought resistance, moderate shade tolerance and very cold tolerant but will not suffer winter damage from cold. Is usually planted as plugs, can be laid as sod.

Emerald – Fine leaf blade, dark green color, tight growth pattern, high maintenance, drought resistance, moderate shade tolerance and warm weather only, cold weather can damage it, is usually planted professionally as sod, can be planted as plugs.

Zenith – Medium leaf blade, deep green color, tight growth pattern, drought resistant, average maintenance, moderate shade tolerance, good cold tolerance, usually planted by seed (recommended to be done by professionals) can be planted by plugs.

Let’s compare, Amazoy has a medium leaf blade, grows very tight (crowds out weeds the best), giving it the feel of walking on a deep carpet, low maintenance. Only needs mowing a few times during the season; Amazoy is very drought resistant, therefore requires less watering. Amazoy will grow in partial shade and can withstand cold temperatures, up to 30 below.

Emerald has a fine leaf, tight growth pattern, (not as tight as Amazoy), requires high maintenance. It requires about 1 ½ inches of water a week and mowing about every 7 to 10 days, will grow in partial shade, but only grows well in warm weather.

Zenith has a medium blade, tight growth pattern, drought resistant and is fairly cold tolerant.  Zenith is usually planted from seed however you must have a bare seedbed, if planted within an existing lawn there is a high failure rate.  Can only be planted from spring to early summer and must be kept moist at least 15 to 25 days and then watered at least once a day for the next 8 to 10 weeks.  Seeding is recommended for professionals only.

Choosing a Grass


posted on February 1st, 2013 by

                                    

               What is the right grass for you? 

With so many different types of grasses available, how do you know what grass is right for you?  There are several different aspects you will need to consider.  First you need to decide what kind of grass you are going to plant, fescue, rye, Bermuda, St. Augustine, zoysia, etc.  Be sure to check on the different strains the grasses have, each one is a little different.   

It is best to look at the main characteristic such as, how is the grass planted; seed, plugs, sod, etc.  Consider what you want from your grass, such as color, maintenance, water requirements, growth pattern, blade size, dormancy, reproduction and durability as well as cost.

It is important to check all of these aspects of the grass. 

  • Color – Some are a light green, deep green, dark green, blue green, etc.
  • Maintenance – How much is required? How frequent does the lawn need to be mowed, watered, fertilized, weed control applied, etc.
  • Watering requirements – Is the grass drought resistant?  Does your area have water restrictions?  What is the average amount of water the grass requires?
  • Blade Size and texture – Do you want a thin blade, medium blade or wide blade? Do you want a grass that feels course, soft grass or a grass that feels like carpet?
  • Growth pattern –  Is the grass a spreading grass or does it need to be reseeded each year?  
  • Seasons – Do you want a grass that will stay green all summer, then you want a “warm” weather grass. Do you want a cold weather grass that can brown out in summer during extreme heat but stays green in the winter?
  • Durability – How much wear and tear can the grass tolerant? Will it hold up to children and pets?
  • Slopes – Do you want a grass with low maintenance and good erosion control or seed the area and hope the seeds take before washing away?

 There is a lot to consider and research, however remember your lawn is something you will want to enjoy for a long, long time. The right decision can make a huge difference!

Zoysia Winter Chores


posted on October 19th, 2012 by

The cold is approaching. One of the first things you’re going to notice is your grass turning a tawny-brown color. Don’t panic, this is natural. Zoysia is a warm-season grass and, like trees, goes dormant after the first hard frost. This helps the Zoysia survive in colder climates and the luscious green will return come spring.

To get your grass ready for the cold weather ahead, mow it at about 1.5 to 2.5 inches. To prevent dead spots, make sure to clean up all the lawn mower clippings. Do not fertilize your Zoysia now. Unlike cold-season grasses, Zoysia prefers to be fertilized in the late spring to early summer months when the grass is growing. Fertilizing now could actually harm your lawn.

Overall Zoysia grass is strong and fairly self-sufficient. The trick to keeping your Zoysia strong during the winter is to keep it strong during the summer. Dethatching to help water and nutrients reach the soil is fine at this time of year before it goes dormant, but is even better when done in the spring. One of the very best things you can do for your lawn is aerating it and now is the perfect time to do this, once again, do this before it goes dormant. Then, just sit back and enjoy how easy Zoysia is to care for while you wait for spring. It’s a time of rest for you and your lawn.

Zoysia In Drought


posted on September 12th, 2012 by

Summer can be a rough time for many grasses and a busy time for homeowners. The grass is trying to survive in the dry, hot weather and you’re trying to keep your lawn green and healthy — unless you’re a Zoysia owner.

However, even Zoysia lawns may be under stress during a drought so it is best to limit all activities that might add to that stress. This includes any fertilizing and weed/pest control. Mowing should only be done if absolutely necessary, on the highest setting possible. Excessive use or play in one area should also be avoided.

One of Zoysia’s best perks is its ability to not only survive in dry climates, but flourish. It needs very little water and adores the heat.

Amazoy will require up to 80% less irrigation than other types of grass. If there has been little rain, as many parts of the country have seen this summer, Zoysia will need a small amount of watering. Water your lawn in the morning, preferably before noon so the grass has time to dry before nightfall.

Check to see if the soil is dry and cracking. If so, it’s time to water. When watering, irrigate deeply and infrequently to mimic natural rainfall. Make sure not to over water or you can cause extensive root damage. If you have questions, check out our Moisture Meter to determine your lawn, or other plants’, watering needs.

The beauty of a Zoysia lawn is that it will stay lush and green in the heat of a normal summer, but Mother Nature can throw some extreme weather our way anytime.

Maintaining Your Zoysia Lawn for Fall


posted on August 21st, 2012 by

A good time to do a little maintenance on your Zoysia lawn is just prior to the start of the fall season. One issue to watch for is thatch build up. Zoysia’s tough stem tissue can encourage thatch, a layer of partially decomposed plant material that builds up on the soil. Removing it helps water and nutrients get to the surface of the soil. Use a hard rake to rip up the thatch, this can be a bit of a workout, or try our easy to apply organic liquid thatch remover.

Aerating is the process of poking holes in the soil to allow water, oxygen and nutrients to better penetrate to the roots of your lawn. This can be done up to once per season to keep your grass looking great. Make sure the ground is softened by watering the day before aerating. Use an aerator with hollow tines (most equipment rental stores will have them) and criss-cross your lawn putting at least 12 holes per square foot. Make sure not to aerate your lawn during dry, drought conditions when the soil is particularly hard.

Unlike cold weather grasses, Zoysia is best fertilized in the spring, not the fall. Zoysia starts to harden in preparation for the cold weather and fertilizing after August can hinder that natural process.

Protecting Against Weeds and Pests


posted on July 18th, 2012 by

Weeds

One of Zoysia’s most attractive features is it’s resiliency to weeds. Unlike other grasses, Zoysia grows out along the ground. It sends out root stalks, or stolons, that create a thick carpet of grass in your yard. This is not only makes Zoysia lush and beautiful, but helps it to choke out most weeds.

In the event that a weed does manage to grow, a few sprays from Weed Be Gone or a similar water soluble product will make quick work of the pesky plants. Make sure you don’t use Roundup, it’s designed to kill grass! Always read labels carefully before applying any product.

If you start to have issues with crabgrass, your best bet is to use a pre-emergent to kill the crabgrass seed before it has a chance to germinate. Our Gluten–8 Organic Herbicide is a great product for this. For the best results, pre-emergence products should be used in early spring and again in the fall.

Pests

You guessed it, Zoysia is very resilient to most lawn pests, with only a few exceptions. This lets you avoid the cost, time and risk of using pesticides. The few pests that can sometimes pester your Zoysia are grubs, mole crickets, cinch bugs and nematodes, especially when the plugs are still new.

If you have a history of dealing with the mentioned pests, it would be a good idea to treat your lawn for them before planting plugs. If you have treat for them after your lawn has been planted, don’t worry, Zoysia isn’t bothered by the chemicals used.

Caring For Your Zoysia In The Summer Heat


posted on July 2nd, 2012 by

Summer can be a rough time for many grasses and a busy time for homeowners. The grass is trying to survive in the dry, hot weather and you’re trying to keep your lawn green and healthy. This is one of Zoysia’s biggest strengths. As a warm weather grass, it thrives in hot weather, requiring very little maintenance compared to other grasses visit our website for more information about Zoysia’s perks). Zoysia does require a small amount of summer time work however:

Watering You Zoysia

Amazoy will require up to 80% less irrigation than other types of grass, and will only need supplemental watering if there has been little rainfall. The best time to water your lawn is in the morning, preferably before noon. This allows the grass to dry before nightfall, reducing the risk of disease.

A good way to test if your grass needs watering is to look at the surrounding soil. If it’s dry and cracking, it’s time to water your Zoysia grass. Be sure to avoid over watering, because excessive watering can damage the roots. If you have questions, check out our Moisture Meter to determine your lawn (or other plants) watering needs.

Mowing Your Zoysia

Grass maintenance for Zoysia is pretty simple. You will spend less time mowing your lawn (about two-thirds less time, to be exact) because Zoysia doesn’t grow tall as quickly as other grasses.

However, you do want to keep this general rule of thumb in mind: A healthy Zoysia lawn should be mowed to a height of 1 1/2“ to 3”. A golden rule when mowing any turf is “never cut more than 1/3 of the leaf height.”