Posts Tagged ‘ grass plugs ’

Most Common Suspects When Zoysia Plugs Don’t Grow


posted on March 11th, 2014 by admin

                  

Why didn’t my plugs work, it says they will grow anywhere?  When this question is asked we play detective to find the reason why.   CSI Zoysia has a list of suspects, let’s investigate.

Suspect #1 – Left in the Box

Plant the plugs as soon as you can.  If you cannot plant right away, that’s fine but the plugs must be taken out of the box, laid grass side up, kept out of the direct sunlight and sprinkled daily.  The plugs can actually survive 2 to 3 weeds before planting if these steps are followed.  Do not leave the grass in the box!

Suspect #2 – Gets Enough Sun

Before planting the grass check out the area and make sure it gets at least 2 to 3 hours of direct sunlight a day or the plugs will not grow well.

Suspect #3 – Not Following Label Instructions

By not stopping and reading the label of products applied to your lawn, such as weed killers, fertilizers, etc you could end up with dead plugs.  You want to check and be sure it is safe for zoysia grass, follow their recommend applications and waiting period before planting.

Suspect #4 – Too Much Water

Over watering is the Prime Suspect for the plugs to fail.  Amazoy zoysia is very drought resistant, too much water can damage its root system. When first planted the plugs do need to be watered daily but only about 10 to 15 minutes once a day, for the first three weeks.  Do not over water the plugs, this can kill them. 

Suspect #5 – Covering the Plugs

Do not cover the entire plug. Only cover the roots of the plugs, leaving the blades above ground level.   After covering the roots step on the plug firmly to eliminate any air pockets.

Suspect # 6 – Too Many Weeds

Until the plugs have completely filled in, they still need help with weed control. If you let the weeds take over, they can choke out the plugs.  Once the plugs are established, they will choke out most summer weeds.

Making sure none of these suspects are threats to your plugs, you should start to see new green blades of grass growing from each plug and you are on your way to a beautiful zoysia lawn!

What is the Big Deal About Soil pH? part 2


posted on December 3rd, 2013 by admin

How do I know what my soil pH is? Do I need to change it?  How do I correct it?

Answers and solutions to these questions are very easy!

Different plants prefer different soil pH levels.  For zoysia grass the recommended soil pH levels are between 6 and 7.

To find out the level of your soil pH you would need to test the soil.  Different parts of your property may have different pH levels, it is best to check several areas.  This can be done by taking samples of your soil to your local Agriculture Office, which can be found online,  just enter your state name and Agriculture Extension Office,  or you can simply test it yourself.  If testing the soil yourself you only need a soil pH tester, such as our Soil pH Meter.

Adjusting the soil pH is simple.  If your soil pH is below a 6 your soil is acidic. To bring the pH up you would need to add lime to your lawn.  Since it can take several months to alter your soil pH it is best to apply lime in the fall or winter, however it can be applied at any time of the year.  When choosing a lime product, please keep in mind the smaller the lime particles are the more effective they are. Lime can also be applied as a liquid. Check out our liquid Café Lime!

If your soil pH is above a 7 your soil is alkaline.  To lower the pH you would need to apply Aluminum Sulfate or Sulfur.  These products can be applied at any time, please be sure to follow the package instructions or over applying could burn your lawn. Your local garden center should carry these products.

How Many Plugs Do I Need


posted on February 25th, 2013 by admin

How Many Plugs Should One Buy?

When you are ready to start your Amazoy zoysia lawn, the first thing you need to do is measure the area for the square footage. Following the steps below will assist you in calculating how many plugs you will need.  We recommend 2 plugs per every square foot.  Planting at this rate it will take about 1 to 1 1/2 seasons (years) for your zoysia plugs to completely fill in. You can increase or decrease the number of plugs per square foot, however this will alter the fill in time.

To determine the total number of plugs required, measure the length and width of the area to be covered. There is no need to be exact, getting the approximate length by width and adding a bit to both will ensure you order enough plugs.  It may make it easier if you break the area down in sections, for example if you are planting your entire lawn your backyard would be one section, side lawn would be the second section and front lawn would be the third section.

Once you have the measurements, enter them in our plug calculator and it will determine the number of plugs you need whether you are planting one plug every square foot or up to 4 plugs per square foot. The calculator will help figure out how many plugs you need if your lawn is circular, triangular, or free-form in shape, just break these areas down into smaller blocks.  You can enter up to eight areas on the calculator at one time.

Different types of Zoysia Grass


posted on February 15th, 2013 by admin

 ZoysiaLawn

Many people do not realize that there are numerous strains of zoysia grass, all are a little different.   Below are a few of the commonly used strains of zoysia to show you how they are different. Let’s start with Amazoy our name for Meyers, Z-52 the original zoysia grass.

Amazoy – Medium leaf blade, deep green color, very tight growth pattern, low maintenance, drought resistance, moderate shade tolerance and very cold tolerant but will not suffer winter damage from cold. Is usually planted as plugs, can be laid as sod.

Emerald – Fine leaf blade, dark green color, tight growth pattern, high maintenance, drought resistance, moderate shade tolerance and warm weather only, cold weather can damage it, is usually planted professionally as sod, can be planted as plugs.

Zenith – Medium leaf blade, deep green color, tight growth pattern, drought resistant, average maintenance, moderate shade tolerance, good cold tolerance, usually planted by seed (recommended to be done by professionals) can be planted by plugs.

Let’s compare, Amazoy has a medium leaf blade, grows very tight (crowds out weeds the best), giving it the feel of walking on a deep carpet, low maintenance. Only needs mowing a few times during the season; Amazoy is very drought resistant, therefore requires less watering. Amazoy will grow in partial shade and can withstand cold temperatures, up to 30 below.

Emerald has a fine leaf, tight growth pattern, (not as tight as Amazoy), requires high maintenance. It requires about 1 ½ inches of water a week and mowing about every 7 to 10 days, will grow in partial shade, but only grows well in warm weather.

Zenith has a medium blade, tight growth pattern, drought resistant and is fairly cold tolerant.  Zenith is usually planted from seed however you must have a bare seedbed, if planted within an existing lawn there is a high failure rate.  Can only be planted from spring to early summer and must be kept moist at least 15 to 25 days and then watered at least once a day for the next 8 to 10 weeks.  Seeding is recommended for professionals only.

Choosing a Grass


posted on February 1st, 2013 by admin

                                    

               What is the right grass for you? 

With so many different types of grasses available, how do you know what grass is right for you?  There are several different aspects you will need to consider.  First you need to decide what kind of grass you are going to plant, fescue, rye, Bermuda, St. Augustine, zoysia, etc.  Be sure to check on the different strains the grasses have, each one is a little different.   

It is best to look at the main characteristic such as, how is the grass planted; seed, plugs, sod, etc.  Consider what you want from your grass, such as color, maintenance, water requirements, growth pattern, blade size, dormancy, reproduction and durability as well as cost.

It is important to check all of these aspects of the grass. 

  • Color – Some are a light green, deep green, dark green, blue green, etc.
  • Maintenance – How much is required? How frequent does the lawn need to be mowed, watered, fertilized, weed control applied, etc.
  • Watering requirements - Is the grass drought resistant?  Does your area have water restrictions?  What is the average amount of water the grass requires?
  • Blade Size and texture - Do you want a thin blade, medium blade or wide blade? Do you want a grass that feels course, soft grass or a grass that feels like carpet?
  • Growth pattern -  Is the grass a spreading grass or does it need to be reseeded each year?  
  • Seasons – Do you want a grass that will stay green all summer, then you want a “warm” weather grass. Do you want a cold weather grass that can brown out in summer during extreme heat but stays green in the winter?
  • Durability – How much wear and tear can the grass tolerant? Will it hold up to children and pets?
  • Slopes – Do you want a grass with low maintenance and good erosion control or seed the area and hope the seeds take before washing away?

 There is a lot to consider and research, however remember your lawn is something you will want to enjoy for a long, long time. The right decision can make a huge difference!

Lawn Aeration


posted on September 1st, 2010 by John

Plush GrassLawn aeration is probably the single best thing a homeowner can do for an established lawn.

To look its best, a lawn should be aerated at least once per year. Aeration is the process of mechanically poking holes in the soil to allow water, oxygen, and nutrients to better penetrate to the roots of your grass.

The best time to aerate your Zoysia lawn is in the spring, just before your grass beings to grow rapidly. Aeration machines are generally available from equipment rental stores.

Aerating your Zoysia Lawn Do’s and Don’ts

Do:

- Make sure the ground is soft enough. Water your lawn the day before you aerate.
- Use an aerator with hollow tines which pull up plugs of earth as the machine travels along.
- Use a criss-cross pattern. Direct the machine over the entire lawn, going back and forth in one direction. Then direct the machine to cross over the first set of rows in the opposite direction.
- Put at least 12 holes per two square feet of lawn.
- If you would like to remove the plugs of soil on the grass surface, let them dry a few days, then drag a small piece of carpet across the lawn to break them apart.
- Aerate in late April, just as the lawn is ready for vigorous growth.

Don’t:

- Use solid-tine spike aerators, which provide less benefits to your lawn.
- Aerate if your Zoysia is suffering from drought, the ground is hard and dry.
- Aerate during a dormant growth period.
- Aerate your lawn within the first year of establishment.

Benefits of Aerating Your Lawn

- Allows oxygen to get to the roots and the soil, allowing it to breathe.
- Increases grass growth.
- Allows organic fertilizers and nutrients get access to the root system.
- Water is able to better soak the soil and reach the root system.
- Helps to break up thatch.
- Loosens compacted soils, allowing the root system to grow.
- Allows pesticides to become more effective.
- Reduces the amount of weeds.

Aerating is ecologically friendly and can significantly improve the quality and consistency of your lawn growth. Read more about organic lawn care for your Zoysia lawn.

How To: Compost Your Grass Clippings


posted on August 26th, 2010 by Steve Schug

Everyone enjoys a beautiful, green lawn. However, lawns can create large amounts of grass cuttings which need to be disposed of. A great way to make good use of your Zoysia clippings that is both easy and environmentally friendly is creating a compost bin in your yard. A few simple steps can help your compost bin be productive, and prevent it from turning into a slimy problem that some may associate with composting.

Tips for Composting

- Mix grass cuttings with a tough more fibrous material like hedge clippings, wood chips, and leaves. The layers of grass clippings and brown material should be alternated. This balances the nitrogen level and provides air pockets that assist the breakdown process.

- Check the moisture of the compost. The material should be like a wrung out sponge. If the compost is too wet, add dry leafy material. If the compost is too dry, add water and thoroughly mix it in.

- Aerate the compost bin occasionally. Using a garden fork, turn the compost to aid the composting process. Mix the materials to avoid packing, and to increase the air pockets.

- If you have recently applied chemicals or herbicides to your lawn, wail until the rain has washed them clean before you add them to your compost pile.

- Add lime to your compost. This will jump start the decomposition process and prevent your pile from developing an unpleasant odor.

If all goes well, you will have a nice layer of compost at the bottom of your bin. Find out more about composting, or read more about maintaining your Zoysia lawn the right way.

Zoysia: Fertilizing New Plugs


posted on April 27th, 2010 by Steve Schug

Amazoy Zoysia is known to grow in virtually any soil: clay, salty, sandy, and even rocky soils. So no matter what kind of soil is under your grass, it is pretty likely that zoysia will grow. But any grass can do with a little nourishment. If you are looking to speed up the process of plug establishment, fertilizer is a great place to start.

Fertilizing Zoysia PlugsIf you do decide that fertilizer is for you, one very important rule is be sure to NOT use granular fertilizers. These can be hazardous to your plugs and can destroy an established zoysia lawn. Using a water-soluble fertilizer, like Nutri-20, is the way to go. These types are better suited for zoysia grass and will help nourish them in the right ways. You can even use it for your garden; water-soluble fertilizers do wonders for vegetables, flowers, and shrubs, too.

Planting Zoysia Grass Plugs


posted on April 20th, 2010 by Steve Schug

Once you have ordered and received your Amazoy Zoysia grass plugs, your next step is actual planting. And with over five decades of experience in harvesting, packaging, delivery, and planting, we have this planting process down to a science. Before you begin planting, there are a few things to think about.

First, be sure it is the right time of year for you to plant. Zoysia can be planted throughout the spring, summer, and fall, but check out our map to see when is the premium season for your region. Next, you must finish separating the plugs with shears. This is because in our attempt to ensure maximum freshness for you, the plugs are not cut entirely through before shipment.

Finally, you must have a planting plan. Using our example diagram, plan where you are going to place your zoysia plugs. Holes should be made no more than a foot apart. If you want your new lawn to fill in more quickly, you can plant your plugs closer together (half a foot apart). When you are finally ready to put the plugs into the ground, consult the planting instructions that come with each order. But just in case you misplace them, you can follow the steps below.

Planting Instructions

1. Mow your existing lawn as low as possible.
2. Ensure that your ground is workable and moist enough for planting.
3. Once you have determined a starting point, insert the plugger into the ground to remove established grass. You can also drill a hole, depending on the tool you are using. Now you will have a hole for your plugs.
4. Put the zoysia plug in the hole you just created, filling in around the edges with loose soil. Make sure to only bury the roots, as the living plant needs sunlight to grow.
5. Lightly compress the plug into the ground with the heel of your foot or hand.
6. Water LIGHTLY.

To see the proper way to plant, check out this video:

Got Bugs?


posted on April 12th, 2010 by Steve Schug

Luckily, because of the nature of our Amazoy Zoysia, insects and pests are not as common a problem as with regular grasses. Established Amazoy is pretty resistant to most pests and the threat they may hold to grass.

However, there are some exceptions. Amazoy is not resistant to grubs, mole crickets, cinch bugs, and nematodes, especially newly planted plugs. If you have experienced any of these pests, we recommend that you treat for these before planting your plugs. If you don’t, these aggressive pests may eat the tender roots of your new Amazoy Zoysia grass.

If for some reason, insects present a problem after your grass has been established, no need to worry. Zoysia is good at resisting injury from most chemicals when pest problems arise.