Posts Tagged ‘ lawn maintenance ’

What is the Big Deal About Soil pH? part 2


posted on December 3rd, 2013 by

How do I know what my soil pH is? Do I need to change it?  How do I correct it?

Answers and solutions to these questions are very easy!

Different plants prefer different soil pH levels.  For zoysia grass the recommended soil pH levels are between 6 and 7.

To find out the level of your soil pH you would need to test the soil.  Different parts of your property may have different pH levels, it is best to check several areas.  This can be done by taking samples of your soil to your local Agriculture Office, which can be found online,  just enter your state name and Agriculture Extension Office,  or you can simply test it yourself.  If testing the soil yourself you only need a soil pH tester, such as our Soil pH Meter.

Adjusting the soil pH is simple.  If your soil pH is below a 6 your soil is acidic. To bring the pH up you would need to add lime to your lawn.  Since it can take several months to alter your soil pH it is best to apply lime in the fall or winter, however it can be applied at any time of the year.  When choosing a lime product, please keep in mind the smaller the lime particles are the more effective they are. Lime can also be applied as a liquid. Check out our liquid Café Lime!

If your soil pH is above a 7 your soil is alkaline.  To lower the pH you would need to apply Aluminum Sulfate or Sulfur.  These products can be applied at any time, please be sure to follow the package instructions or over applying could burn your lawn. Your local garden center should carry these products.

Zoysia in Summer Heat


posted on July 10th, 2013 by

                                           Zoysia in Summer Heat 

Looks like we may be in for another hot summer! With the temperatures reaching the 90’s and even into the 100’s it is hard to keep your grass green unless you have an Amazoy zoysia lawn. Zoysia grass loves the sunshine and heat, withstanding temperatures up to 120 degrees.  When your neighbor’s lawns are turning brown because of the heat, your zoysia will retain its lush green color. 

If you are lucky enough to have an Amazoy zoysia lawn, you know that it is very drought tolerant and stands up to the heat.  Please remember zoysia is a living thing and needs some watering in drought type conditions.  

What are drought type conditions?  This is when you have not had any rain for at least a week, your temperatures are above 90 degrees and your ground is dried out and depending on the type of soil you have even cracking.  The grass blades of the zoysia may also start to curl, this is called penciling.  These are signs that it is time to water your zoysia lawn.  Watering for about 10 to 15 minutes 2 to 3 times a week during drought conditions should be plenty for your zoysia lawn to stay healthy and green.  

During extremely warm temperatures, do not use fertilizers, insect or weed control products on your lawn.  These treatments in the extreme heat usually are not effective and can even burn your lawn.  It is best to apply theses products when your temperatures are in the low 80’s and never in the heat of the day.

Different types of Zoysia Grass


posted on February 15th, 2013 by

 ZoysiaLawn

Many people do not realize that there are numerous strains of zoysia grass, all are a little different.   Below are a few of the commonly used strains of zoysia to show you how they are different. Let’s start with Amazoy our name for Meyers, Z-52 the original zoysia grass.

Amazoy – Medium leaf blade, deep green color, very tight growth pattern, low maintenance, drought resistance, moderate shade tolerance and very cold tolerant but will not suffer winter damage from cold. Is usually planted as plugs, can be laid as sod.

Emerald – Fine leaf blade, dark green color, tight growth pattern, high maintenance, drought resistance, moderate shade tolerance and warm weather only, cold weather can damage it, is usually planted professionally as sod, can be planted as plugs.

Zenith – Medium leaf blade, deep green color, tight growth pattern, drought resistant, average maintenance, moderate shade tolerance, good cold tolerance, usually planted by seed (recommended to be done by professionals) can be planted by plugs.

Let’s compare, Amazoy has a medium leaf blade, grows very tight (crowds out weeds the best), giving it the feel of walking on a deep carpet, low maintenance. Only needs mowing a few times during the season; Amazoy is very drought resistant, therefore requires less watering. Amazoy will grow in partial shade and can withstand cold temperatures, up to 30 below.

Emerald has a fine leaf, tight growth pattern, (not as tight as Amazoy), requires high maintenance. It requires about 1 ½ inches of water a week and mowing about every 7 to 10 days, will grow in partial shade, but only grows well in warm weather.

Zenith has a medium blade, tight growth pattern, drought resistant and is fairly cold tolerant.  Zenith is usually planted from seed however you must have a bare seedbed, if planted within an existing lawn there is a high failure rate.  Can only be planted from spring to early summer and must be kept moist at least 15 to 25 days and then watered at least once a day for the next 8 to 10 weeks.  Seeding is recommended for professionals only.

Choosing a Grass


posted on February 1st, 2013 by

                                    

               What is the right grass for you? 

With so many different types of grasses available, how do you know what grass is right for you?  There are several different aspects you will need to consider.  First you need to decide what kind of grass you are going to plant, fescue, rye, Bermuda, St. Augustine, zoysia, etc.  Be sure to check on the different strains the grasses have, each one is a little different.   

It is best to look at the main characteristic such as, how is the grass planted; seed, plugs, sod, etc.  Consider what you want from your grass, such as color, maintenance, water requirements, growth pattern, blade size, dormancy, reproduction and durability as well as cost.

It is important to check all of these aspects of the grass. 

  • Color – Some are a light green, deep green, dark green, blue green, etc.
  • Maintenance – How much is required? How frequent does the lawn need to be mowed, watered, fertilized, weed control applied, etc.
  • Watering requirements - Is the grass drought resistant?  Does your area have water restrictions?  What is the average amount of water the grass requires?
  • Blade Size and texture - Do you want a thin blade, medium blade or wide blade? Do you want a grass that feels course, soft grass or a grass that feels like carpet?
  • Growth pattern -  Is the grass a spreading grass or does it need to be reseeded each year?  
  • Seasons – Do you want a grass that will stay green all summer, then you want a “warm” weather grass. Do you want a cold weather grass that can brown out in summer during extreme heat but stays green in the winter?
  • Durability – How much wear and tear can the grass tolerant? Will it hold up to children and pets?
  • Slopes – Do you want a grass with low maintenance and good erosion control or seed the area and hope the seeds take before washing away?

 There is a lot to consider and research, however remember your lawn is something you will want to enjoy for a long, long time. The right decision can make a huge difference!

Mow Your Lawn the RIGHT Way: Lawn Care the Old Way


posted on June 15th, 2010 by

Are you really mowing your lawn the right way? Most people aren’t exceptionally fond of this lawn maintenance task, but if you do it the right way, you can enjoy a nice lawn. All About Lawns gives us a few mowing tips that can help to keep the quality of your grass looking great while still saving time.

Don’t Cut Your Grass Too Short

Cutting your grass to short can help destroy it by making it vulnerable to weeds and insects. You are going to want to keep your blade sharp, too. Dull blades can destroy the grass shaft. One rule of thumb: never cut more than 1/3 of the grass height.

Cut at Appropriate Times

Spring is the time for most grass cutting, which would be about once a week, depending on your personal preferences. During warm weather, grass should be cut a few times a month. Don’t over water; it can help cut down on growth.

Leave Lawn Clippings

This is a key time saver. Don’t waste time with bagging grass. Leaving the clippings on your lawn will help nutrition of your lawn. It can also help retain water so that you don’t have to spend as much time watering it.

Zoysia: The Solution

You could maintain your lawn using the tips we just gave you, or you could invest in zoysia.

Grass maintenance for zoysia is pretty simple. You will spend less time mowing your lawn (about two-thirds less time, to be exact) because of the very nature of zoysia grass, although you do want to keep the general rule of thumb in mind. You won’t ever have to use fertilizers or pesticides, and you will rarely have to water.

Which sounds better to you?

Low Maintenance Lawns: Part II


posted on June 1st, 2010 by

Zoysia Low Maintenance LawnIn our last post, we let you know about some ways that a low maintenance lawn could help save you money while being environmentally friendly. Here are a few more ways that you can save a buck while helping to save the environment.

Lawn Mowing

Lawns need to be cut, which can create an entire set of environmental issues on its own. Lawn mowers can be damaging by emitting air and noise pollution. However, there are some ways to help solve this problem. Rechargeable electric mowers are definitely environmentally friendly (they are friendly to your wallet, too). These are good for lawns up to about ¾ of an acre. An area that is larger than that usually requires a gas powered tractor, which isn’t so friendly to the environment. Newer ones are more efficient and becoming less offensive, but may not be the ideal solution.

The simplest and best solution is to pick a slow growing grass, like zoysia, for your lawn. This will require less mowing, which will ultimately save you time and money while helping the environment by cutting down on emissions. You can even leave the clippings on the lawn to help turn old grass into organic material to keep moisture on your soil.

Fertilization

Another great aspect of low maintenance lawns like zoysia is that you don’t have to fertilize as often, if at all, which will ultimately mean slower growth and less cutting. It also means less potential for harsh chemicals to end up in our waterways. But if you do choose to fertilize, going organic is the best way to go about it. Having a sustainable lawn really means starting with choosing the right grass type suitable to your local conditions. It is key to understanding the characteristics of your grass so that you can know what you can do to help save time, money, and the environment. Putting in the right grass is the first step to a sustainable lawn.