Posts Tagged ‘ Soil ’

Most Common Suspects When Zoysia Plugs Don’t Grow


posted on March 11th, 2014 by

                  

Why didn’t my plugs work, it says they will grow anywhere?  When this question is asked we play detective to find the reason why.   CSI Zoysia has a list of suspects, let’s investigate.

Suspect #1 – Left in the Box

Plant the plugs as soon as you can.  If you cannot plant right away, that’s fine but the plugs must be taken out of the box, laid grass side up, kept out of the direct sunlight and sprinkled daily.  The plugs can actually survive 2 to 3 weeds before planting if these steps are followed.  Do not leave the grass in the box!

Suspect #2 – Gets Enough Sun

Before planting the grass check out the area and make sure it gets at least 2 to 3 hours of direct sunlight a day or the plugs will not grow well.

Suspect #3 – Not Following Label Instructions

By not stopping and reading the label of products applied to your lawn, such as weed killers, fertilizers, etc you could end up with dead plugs.  You want to check and be sure it is safe for zoysia grass, follow their recommend applications and waiting period before planting.

Suspect #4 – Too Much Water

Over watering is the Prime Suspect for the plugs to fail.  Amazoy zoysia is very drought resistant, too much water can damage its root system. When first planted the plugs do need to be watered daily but only about 10 to 15 minutes once a day, for the first three weeks.  Do not over water the plugs, this can kill them. 

Suspect #5 – Covering the Plugs

Do not cover the entire plug. Only cover the roots of the plugs, leaving the blades above ground level.   After covering the roots step on the plug firmly to eliminate any air pockets.

Suspect # 6 – Too Many Weeds

Until the plugs have completely filled in, they still need help with weed control. If you let the weeds take over, they can choke out the plugs.  Once the plugs are established, they will choke out most summer weeds.

Making sure none of these suspects are threats to your plugs, you should start to see new green blades of grass growing from each plug and you are on your way to a beautiful zoysia lawn!

What is the Big Deal About Soil pH? part 2


posted on December 3rd, 2013 by

How do I know what my soil pH is? Do I need to change it?  How do I correct it?

Answers and solutions to these questions are very easy!

Different plants prefer different soil pH levels.  For zoysia grass the recommended soil pH levels are between 6 and 7.

To find out the level of your soil pH you would need to test the soil.  Different parts of your property may have different pH levels, it is best to check several areas.  This can be done by taking samples of your soil to your local Agriculture Office, which can be found online,  just enter your state name and Agriculture Extension Office,  or you can simply test it yourself.  If testing the soil yourself you only need a soil pH tester, such as our Soil pH Meter.

Adjusting the soil pH is simple.  If your soil pH is below a 6 your soil is acidic. To bring the pH up you would need to add lime to your lawn.  Since it can take several months to alter your soil pH it is best to apply lime in the fall or winter, however it can be applied at any time of the year.  When choosing a lime product, please keep in mind the smaller the lime particles are the more effective they are. Lime can also be applied as a liquid. Check out our liquid Café Lime!

If your soil pH is above a 7 your soil is alkaline.  To lower the pH you would need to apply Aluminum Sulfate or Sulfur.  These products can be applied at any time, please be sure to follow the package instructions or over applying could burn your lawn. Your local garden center should carry these products.

What Is the Big Deal about Soil PH? – Part 1


posted on October 30th, 2013 by

 

 What is soil pH?  What are the numbers about? What does it do?   

Most of us do not realize the importance of the proper soil pH or what it is.  The soil pH is the acidity level of your soil, which allows your plants to take up the necessary nutrients from the soil.  The level has a tremendous impact on the overall health of your plants, it also helps fertilizers and pesticides to be more effective. Poor pH whether it is too high or too low can make your grass week, susceptible to disease problems and be a light green or yellow in color. 

Every type of soil has a pH level.  There are several factors that help determine what your soil pH is, such as your region, the type of parent material your soil is, such as clay, sand, organic matter, etc.  The age of the soil, the amount of precipitation and temperatures are also main factors. 

     How do I know what my soil pH is?  Do I need to change it? How do I adjust it?

Follow our blog for information in our next article on how to test and adjust your soil pH. It is not hard to do!

The Types of Soil and Your Zoysia Lawn


posted on April 14th, 2011 by

The soil underneath of your Zoysia lawn supplies your grass with nutrients and water as it grows.  While Zoysia grows well in a variety of soils, in order to be sure your lawn will grow successfully and look its best, it’s important to know the type of soil you’re working with.

Sand

Sandy soil is made of larger rock particles that fit loosely together.  While this type of soil does not lend itself to remaining moist, its roomy airspaces allow Zoysia’s roots to penetrate and provide quicker root development.  Prior to planting, though, this type of soil might require some alteration in the form of manure or compost if it is more sand than soil.

Silt

Silt-based soils are made of medium-sized particles that can often only be seen with the aide of a microscope.  These types of soils shed water quickly, but feel slick to the touch when they are wet.  They tend to be rich in nutrients and a great growing environment.

Clay

Clay-like soils are made of tiny particle that stick tightly together.  These soils hold water and nutrients well, but they are also susceptible to “winter heaving” which can be harmful to perennial plants.  It is best to mix your clay soil well with an organic matter to reduce its compaction, making it easier for roots to grow.

Organic Matter

Organic matter is made of organic materials like compost, decomposed manure and shredded leaves.  When applied to sandy or clay-like soils, it helps to maintain ideal moisture levels and creates airspace to help roots grow as needed.  By adding organic matter in moderation, you alter your existing soil and give your Zoysia lawn the best chance to grow and thrive.

Remember, a big part of keeping your lawn healthy and beautiful is knowing what’s underneath it.  Knowing what type of soil you have prior to planting your Zoysia lawn will help it to grow and thrive for years to come.

Knowing Your Lawn: Soil


posted on April 6th, 2010 by

Keeping your lawn maintained and looking great starts with knowing what is underneath it: soil. You might think “dirt is dirt”, but in fact, soil can have quite the range. Being knowledgeable of what kind of soil you have in your yard will help you make the right choices for your lawn.

There are a few things you should be considering when thinking about soil and lawn care maintenance.

Test Your Soil

First, you should test your soil. Knowing what kind of soil you’ve got will help you know what nutrients you need. You can test your soil using a pH meter or a soil test kit.

Your pH meter will tell you the pH of your soil, which will range from 3 to 10 on the pH scale (see below). A 7 on the scale marks neutrality; any soil above that is considered basic or alkaline, while anything below is considered acidic. Most good soils will range from 5-7.

Discover Your Soil Type

After finding out the pH of your soil, you should grab a handful of your soil to discover the texture and type. If your handful of soil holds shape, it is clay-like. If it doesn’t it will be more sandy.

Clay like soil has a few advantages. It holds moisture and nutrients well, which means less time watering and less money spent on fertilizers. Despite this, there are a few disadvantages.

Clay like soil has poor drainage, allowing it to become oversaturated and deprive plants from the oxygen it needs. It can also warm slowly in spring, shortening the planting season. When it does dry, it can crust or crack, causing plant roots to tear.

Sandy soil has advantages. It drains easily and quickly, allowing for oxygen. It also is easily worked, and warms quickly in spring, allowing for quick planting. Despite these things, it also tends to have a low capacity for holding both moisture, needing more water and fertilizer. It is also subject to erosion.

An ideal soil is something in between sandy and clay like. To read more about soil types, click here.

Fix It

If you’ve got clay like or sandy soil, there are a few things you can do to alter it to your needs. Add a generous amount of organic matter, like compost, manure, or peat moss. Spread a layer, between 3 or 4 inches thick, over your existing soil. Then thoroughly incorporate it into your existing soil. Be sure to do this, because just adding a layer on top won’t help.

Remember, do add organic matter in moderation. Too much can be harmful and toxic to your lawn.

Your Soil and Zoysia Plugs

Luckily, zoysia can grow in a variety of soils. But it is always best to alter your soil before planting plugs. It will help encourage your zoysia lawn establish and grow hearty and lush.