Posts Tagged ‘ Zoysia Farm Nurseries ’

What Is the Big Deal about Soil PH? – Part 1


posted on October 30th, 2013 by admin

 

 What is soil pH?  What are the numbers about? What does it do?   

Most of us do not realize the importance of the proper soil pH or what it is.  The soil pH is the acidity level of your soil, which allows your plants to take up the necessary nutrients from the soil.  The level has a tremendous impact on the overall health of your plants, it also helps fertilizers and pesticides to be more effective. Poor pH whether it is too high or too low can make your grass week, susceptible to disease problems and be a light green or yellow in color. 

Every type of soil has a pH level.  There are several factors that help determine what your soil pH is, such as your region, the type of parent material your soil is, such as clay, sand, organic matter, etc.  The age of the soil, the amount of precipitation and temperatures are also main factors. 

     How do I know what my soil pH is?  Do I need to change it? How do I adjust it?

Follow our blog for information in our next article on how to test and adjust your soil pH. It is not hard to do!

How Many Plugs Do I Need


posted on February 25th, 2013 by admin

How Many Plugs Should One Buy?

When you are ready to start your Amazoy zoysia lawn, the first thing you need to do is measure the area for the square footage. Following the steps below will assist you in calculating how many plugs you will need.  We recommend 2 plugs per every square foot.  Planting at this rate it will take about 1 to 1 1/2 seasons (years) for your zoysia plugs to completely fill in. You can increase or decrease the number of plugs per square foot, however this will alter the fill in time.

To determine the total number of plugs required, measure the length and width of the area to be covered. There is no need to be exact, getting the approximate length by width and adding a bit to both will ensure you order enough plugs.  It may make it easier if you break the area down in sections, for example if you are planting your entire lawn your backyard would be one section, side lawn would be the second section and front lawn would be the third section.

Once you have the measurements, enter them in our plug calculator and it will determine the number of plugs you need whether you are planting one plug every square foot or up to 4 plugs per square foot. The calculator will help figure out how many plugs you need if your lawn is circular, triangular, or free-form in shape, just break these areas down into smaller blocks.  You can enter up to eight areas on the calculator at one time.

Got Bugs?


posted on April 12th, 2010 by Steve Schug

Luckily, because of the nature of our Amazoy Zoysia, insects and pests are not as common a problem as with regular grasses. Established Amazoy is pretty resistant to most pests and the threat they may hold to grass.

However, there are some exceptions. Amazoy is not resistant to grubs, mole crickets, cinch bugs, and nematodes, especially newly planted plugs. If you have experienced any of these pests, we recommend that you treat for these before planting your plugs. If you don’t, these aggressive pests may eat the tender roots of your new Amazoy Zoysia grass.

If for some reason, insects present a problem after your grass has been established, no need to worry. Zoysia is good at resisting injury from most chemicals when pest problems arise.

Amazoy Zoysia: What’s the Difference?


posted on February 25th, 2010 by Steve Schug

As we have mentioned, Zoysia is a particularly hardy grass that grows well in a wide range of conditions. We also let you know a little bit about its history, both historically and company specific.

But zoysia isn’t just a catchall. There are many different types of zoysia. They act similarly, but can look and grow differently. Read more below about the most popular types of zoysia on the market today.

Amazoy / Meyer Z-52

This is the type of zoysia we specialize in. It has a medium, dark green color and an intermediate leaf texture and shoot density (thickness). It is known for fast spring green up (gain color back if it goes dormant) and is the most cold tolerant. It is sold as plugs and sod.

Emerald

Emerald zoysia is a hybrid of zoysia, and was developed in Georgia. It is dark green in color, with a very fine leaf texture. It grows more quickly than other zoysia, but is only available as sod. This hybrid grass has fair shade tolerance and high shoot density, but doesn’t have superb cold weather tolerance.

Matrella / Manila

Zoysia matrella or manila grass originated on the island of Manila, hence its name. It has an intermediate leaf texture and shoot density. It does not hold up well in colder temperatures and is slow to establish.

Zenith

Similar to Meyer Z-52 in appearance, but grows less dense. It does not do well in areas that are shaded and its ability to withstand cold temperatures is questionable.

Empire

This type of zoysia is from Brazil. It has a courser texture than other zoysia and is the least cold tolerant.

To see descriptions of other zoysia grasses, click here.

I Can Order Grass Online!?


posted on February 23rd, 2010 by Julie

You may be wondering how such a thing is possible. Well, it is, and we pride ourselves on providing you zoysia grass plugs through online ordering. Here are a few things to consider when thinking about ordering online.

Maximum Order

It just so happens that Amazoy is pretty popular. And because only so much is available per season, we must limit the maximum plug order to 13,300 plugs at one time. However, re-orders can be made every 60 days. To calculate how much you might need, check out our plug calculator.

Shipping

We ship throughout the continental United States, with the exception of Washington and Oregon. These two states’ wet weather conditions are not conducive to the successful growth of Amazoy zoysia.

Credit card charge will only be processed when the order has been harvested and on its way to you.

Guarantee

Our years of experience and confidence in our methods allows us to make a unique guarantee not traditionally found in the garden industry. Our guarantee is that we will replace any plugs that fail to grow within 45 days of planting.

Retail Store

If you would prefer to pick up your plugs rather than have them shipped directly to you, we do have a retail store, located in Taneytown, Maryland. Our retail store hours of operation are Monday through Friday from 8:30 am to 4:00 pm, (and Saturday from 8:00 am to 1:00 pm between late March and the end of June). All orders are harvested individually and a call (410-756-2311) the day before visiting the farm will ensure your grass is ready when you arrive.

To see our address, click here. To get directions, click here.

The Evolution of Zoysia


posted on February 5th, 2010 by John

So, what is zoysia? Where did it come from? Maybe you have heard the term or have seen advertisements, but in this blog post, we are going help you out a bit.

Zoysia grass, native to southeastern and eastern Asia, is a genus of eight species of spreading grass named after Austrian botanist Karl von Zois. Of the eight species, three are common in the United States: Zoysia Japonica, Zoysia Matrella, and Zoysia Tenuifolia. Meyer Zoysia, which we specialize in here at Zoysia Farm Nurseries, is a strain of the Japonica species.

As mentioned in our last blog post, zoysia made its first appearance in America when botanist C.V. Piper brought it over from Manila. Prior to that, zoysia was popular in Asian culture, dating as far back as the early 12th century.

Here at Zoysia Farm Nurseries, we specialize in Meyer Zoysia, which has a history all its own. According to the USGA Journal and Turf Management, the Meyer Z-52 strain was discovered in 1906 by Frank N. Meyer, a plant explorer for the Division of Plant Exploration. He brought it back to the United States from Korea, where it was filed with the Department of Agriculture as Zoysia pungens. Over time, it became Zoysia japonica, the species name it carries now. It was released by the USDA for commercial development in 1951.

Today, zoysia is used in a wide variety of ways, including golf course fairways, athletic fields, playgrounds, park areas, and home lawns.

Zoysia Grass: A Little History


posted on February 3rd, 2010 by John

The Grass:

Zoysia grass has long been a staple in Asia, with a more recent introduction into American lawn society. According to AllAboutLawns.com, zoysia has been around from as early as the 12th century, being an important part of Japanese gardens and tea ceremonies.

Much later, around the early 1900’s, zoysia made its first appearance in America when botanist C.V. Piper brought it over from Manila. It wasn’t until 1951 that the USDA released zoysia for commercial development.

The Company:

Zoysia Farm Nurseries has a long history behind it. Richard Friedberg, President of Zoysia Farm Nurseries, can remember walking the rows of zoysia test plots at the U.S. Department of Agriculture when he was a young boy. Richard’s father, Herbert, became pretty convinced early on of zoysia and its power to be the solution for American lawns. He also had a brilliant idea: to sell it by mail to homeowners nationwide.

The USDA released zoysia for commercial development in 1951. By 1953, Herbert was the first entrepreneur to focus on zoysia for private lawns. He bought a farm in Maryland, perfected the process of growing and distributing the product, and the rest is history.

Today, zoysia is still as dedicated to bringing beautiful, low-maintenance lawns to every homeowner. Now, Zoysia Farm Nurseries is employee-owned, meaning every member of the staff is equally committed to bringing you a great product and the best service.