Posts Tagged ‘ Zoysia ’

What Is the Big Deal about Soil PH? – Part 1


posted on October 30th, 2013 by

 

 What is soil pH?  What are the numbers about? What does it do?   

Most of us do not realize the importance of the proper soil pH or what it is.  The soil pH is the acidity level of your soil, which allows your plants to take up the necessary nutrients from the soil.  The level has a tremendous impact on the overall health of your plants, it also helps fertilizers and pesticides to be more effective. Poor pH whether it is too high or too low can make your grass week, susceptible to disease problems and be a light green or yellow in color. 

Every type of soil has a pH level.  There are several factors that help determine what your soil pH is, such as your region, the type of parent material your soil is, such as clay, sand, organic matter, etc.  The age of the soil, the amount of precipitation and temperatures are also main factors. 

     How do I know what my soil pH is?  Do I need to change it? How do I adjust it?

Follow our blog for information in our next article on how to test and adjust your soil pH. It is not hard to do!

Different types of Zoysia Grass


posted on February 15th, 2013 by

 ZoysiaLawn

Many people do not realize that there are numerous strains of zoysia grass, all are a little different.   Below are a few of the commonly used strains of zoysia to show you how they are different. Let’s start with Amazoy our name for Meyers, Z-52 the original zoysia grass.

Amazoy – Medium leaf blade, deep green color, very tight growth pattern, low maintenance, drought resistance, moderate shade tolerance and very cold tolerant but will not suffer winter damage from cold. Is usually planted as plugs, can be laid as sod.

Emerald – Fine leaf blade, dark green color, tight growth pattern, high maintenance, drought resistance, moderate shade tolerance and warm weather only, cold weather can damage it, is usually planted professionally as sod, can be planted as plugs.

Zenith – Medium leaf blade, deep green color, tight growth pattern, drought resistant, average maintenance, moderate shade tolerance, good cold tolerance, usually planted by seed (recommended to be done by professionals) can be planted by plugs.

Let’s compare, Amazoy has a medium leaf blade, grows very tight (crowds out weeds the best), giving it the feel of walking on a deep carpet, low maintenance. Only needs mowing a few times during the season; Amazoy is very drought resistant, therefore requires less watering. Amazoy will grow in partial shade and can withstand cold temperatures, up to 30 below.

Emerald has a fine leaf, tight growth pattern, (not as tight as Amazoy), requires high maintenance. It requires about 1 ½ inches of water a week and mowing about every 7 to 10 days, will grow in partial shade, but only grows well in warm weather.

Zenith has a medium blade, tight growth pattern, drought resistant and is fairly cold tolerant.  Zenith is usually planted from seed however you must have a bare seedbed, if planted within an existing lawn there is a high failure rate.  Can only be planted from spring to early summer and must be kept moist at least 15 to 25 days and then watered at least once a day for the next 8 to 10 weeks.  Seeding is recommended for professionals only.

Zoysia In Drought


posted on September 12th, 2012 by

Summer can be a rough time for many grasses and a busy time for homeowners. The grass is trying to survive in the dry, hot weather and you’re trying to keep your lawn green and healthy — unless you’re a Zoysia owner.

However, even Zoysia lawns may be under stress during a drought so it is best to limit all activities that might add to that stress. This includes any fertilizing and weed/pest control. Mowing should only be done if absolutely necessary, on the highest setting possible. Excessive use or play in one area should also be avoided.

One of Zoysia’s best perks is its ability to not only survive in dry climates, but flourish. It needs very little water and adores the heat.

Amazoy will require up to 80% less irrigation than other types of grass. If there has been little rain, as many parts of the country have seen this summer, Zoysia will need a small amount of watering. Water your lawn in the morning, preferably before noon so the grass has time to dry before nightfall.

Check to see if the soil is dry and cracking. If so, it’s time to water. When watering, irrigate deeply and infrequently to mimic natural rainfall. Make sure not to over water or you can cause extensive root damage. If you have questions, check out our Moisture Meter to determine your lawn, or other plants’, watering needs.

The beauty of a Zoysia lawn is that it will stay lush and green in the heat of a normal summer, but Mother Nature can throw some extreme weather our way anytime.

Maintaining Your Zoysia Lawn for Fall


posted on August 21st, 2012 by

A good time to do a little maintenance on your Zoysia lawn is just prior to the start of the fall season. One issue to watch for is thatch build up. Zoysia’s tough stem tissue can encourage thatch, a layer of partially decomposed plant material that builds up on the soil. Removing it helps water and nutrients get to the surface of the soil. Use a hard rake to rip up the thatch, this can be a bit of a workout, or try our easy to apply organic liquid thatch remover.

Aerating is the process of poking holes in the soil to allow water, oxygen and nutrients to better penetrate to the roots of your lawn. This can be done up to once per season to keep your grass looking great. Make sure the ground is softened by watering the day before aerating. Use an aerator with hollow tines (most equipment rental stores will have them) and criss-cross your lawn putting at least 12 holes per square foot. Make sure not to aerate your lawn during dry, drought conditions when the soil is particularly hard.

Unlike cold weather grasses, Zoysia is best fertilized in the spring, not the fall. Zoysia starts to harden in preparation for the cold weather and fertilizing after August can hinder that natural process.

Caring For Your Zoysia In The Summer Heat


posted on July 2nd, 2012 by

Summer can be a rough time for many grasses and a busy time for homeowners. The grass is trying to survive in the dry, hot weather and you’re trying to keep your lawn green and healthy. This is one of Zoysia’s biggest strengths. As a warm weather grass, it thrives in hot weather, requiring very little maintenance compared to other grasses visit our website for more information about Zoysia’s perks). Zoysia does require a small amount of summer time work however:

Watering You Zoysia

Amazoy will require up to 80% less irrigation than other types of grass, and will only need supplemental watering if there has been little rainfall. The best time to water your lawn is in the morning, preferably before noon. This allows the grass to dry before nightfall, reducing the risk of disease.

A good way to test if your grass needs watering is to look at the surrounding soil. If it’s dry and cracking, it’s time to water your Zoysia grass. Be sure to avoid over watering, because excessive watering can damage the roots. If you have questions, check out our Moisture Meter to determine your lawn (or other plants) watering needs.

Mowing Your Zoysia

Grass maintenance for Zoysia is pretty simple. You will spend less time mowing your lawn (about two-thirds less time, to be exact) because Zoysia doesn’t grow tall as quickly as other grasses.

However, you do want to keep this general rule of thumb in mind: A healthy Zoysia lawn should be mowed to a height of 1 1/2“ to 3”. A golden rule when mowing any turf is “never cut more than 1/3 of the leaf height.”

Fertilizing with Mycorrhizal Fungi


posted on May 31st, 2012 by

Fertilizing for Zoysia GrassOne of the newest items in our store is an organic product called Turf Thrive. In cooperation with plant fertilizers to improve your lawn, Turf Thrive works by adding living organisms to the soil called mycorrhizal fungi. What are these, you ask?

Mycorrhizal fungi are an important part of the soil life. They attach themselves to the roots of your grass, effectively making the roots longer. The fungi help your roots absorb more water and nutrients from further away. Lack of water and nutrients can cause stunted growth and brown patches, so the fungi are very important for the health of your lawn.

The fungi are beneficial in other ways. They help your plants fight against toxins and other contaminates in the soil. They also help protect against overly acidic soil and make the plant more resistant to diseases. Think of the fungi as your lawn’s best friend.

Usually mycorrhizal fungi occur naturally in the soil. However, if the soil has been tampered with, including tilling, removal of topsoil, erosion and the application of fertilizer, fungicide or pesticide, the normal fungi in the soil can be affected. Turf Thrive returns these natural fungi that overworked soil has lost. It is not a full replacement for a plant fertilizer, but a compliment to it – Think of them as the dynamic duo of healthy lawns.

 

How Many Plugs Should You Buy?


posted on March 27th, 2012 by

If you’re considering purchasing Zoysia plugs for your lawn, there are a few things you need to consider when placing your order and planting the plugs upon delivery.

Zoysia plugs require less maintenance, produce a heartier lawn and can be planted throughout the growing season.  That said it is important to consider the size of the area you’re interested in planting and how quickly you’d like the area to fill in.  Typically, we suggest planting one plug per square foot.  If you’d like to reduce the amount of time your Zoysia lawn takes to fill in, we recommend planting two plugs per square foot — one plug every six inches.

Need help figuring out square footage and how many plugs to buy for your space?  Try this easy to use Plug Calculator.  Simply divide your lawn into sections, enter the length and width of each and how far apart you’d like to plant your plugs – The calculator will quickly tell you how many plugs you’ll need.

 

Before and After Zoysia


posted on February 8th, 2012 by

One of the key reasons customers choose Zoysia is that it has the ability to grow in a variety of soil types, climates, geographical locations and outdoor applications from home lawns to golf courses.

Homeowners and groundskeepers alike prefer Zoysia over other grasses because it thrives with little mowing or watering. In fact, lush, green Zoysia grass can be achieved in just a few growing seasons with very little mowing or watering.

Take a look at the difference Zoysia made for these lawns:

Before: The shade of this Ohio front yard made it difficult for thick, green grass to grow.

After: Despite the shade, this Zoysia lawn has thrived for several years.

Before: This mid-Atlantic backyard was thin and difficult to maintain.

After: Two growing seasons later, the Zoysia grass has filled in the patchy spots that appeared before.

Before: The 13th hole at this Marietta County golf course in Georgia suffered winter-kill turning the second landing area dry and brown.

After: The repaired landing area is once again lush and green – Helping golfers play their best.

 

Fun Zoysia Facts


posted on December 15th, 2011 by

Around here, we’re quite passionate about Zoysia. That’s why we’ve devoted ourselves to helping others enjoy it! One of the reasons we love Zoysia so much is that it’s a very unique and special grass.

Here are some fun facts we bet you didn’t know about your Zoysia lawn:

– Zoysia was originally a wild grass native to China before being recognized as a good, fast covering grass.

– Over 5,000 years ago, Zoysia was used to cover earthen grave sites so loved ones would have the covering of nature to protect them.

– Instead of just growing vertically like most grasses, Zoysia grows out. It forms a thick network of runner that fills your yard and creates a dense, arterial root system below ground.

– The way Zoysia grows out instead of only up makes it very resilient to damage and able to fill in quickly if it does get hurt. This makes it popular in areas that take heavy abuse, such as golf courses and pathways.

– Zoysia can survive in extreme conditions, withstanding temperatures from 120˚ to –30˚ Fahrenheit. No other turf grass can survive such a range of temperature.

– Zoysia requires about two-thirds less mowing than other grasses. Awesome right?

    Preparing for Winter Dormancy


    posted on November 7th, 2011 by

    With the cold snap imminent, some of you are going to notice your grass turning a tawny-brown color. No need to worry, this is quite natural. Zoysia, like trees, goes dormant after the first hard frost — But instead of losing leaves, its green color fades.

    Zoysia’s dormancy is a safeguard against colder temperatures, up to -30˚ F in fact! Just like trees that regrow their leaves in the spring, Zoysia will come back lush each spring once the soil reaches 50˚F. This behavior is what let’s Zoysia thrive in even the hottest summers.

    Most grasses go dormant at some point in the year. “Cool season” grasses do the opposite, they go dormant and brown in the warm summer months. Zoysia is categorized as a “warm season” grass, so it goes dormant in the winter and is green in the summer, just when you want your grass nice and lush.

    Depending on where you live, your Zoysia may not go dormant at all. If your winters are mild, your lawn will be green year round. Either way, come spring, your lawn will be back to its lush, beautiful green in no time!