The Secrets to Mowing Zoysia Grass


posted on April 24th, 2018 by

Amazoy Meyer Zoysia is a slow-growing grass. When planting at a foot apart, it can take up to 2-3 growing seasons for plugs to completely fill in. Bigger plugs or planting closer together will speed the fill-in process. Much depends on the length of your growing season. Also, the benefit to this slow growth rate is that you will not have to mow nearly as often as you would for other grasses. Zoysia actually only needs to be mowed one time for every three times many other grasses must be cut. However, we have some tips to help you achieve the healthiest Zoysia lawn whenever it comes to mowing.

To start off, Zoysia spreads in a lateral manner, putting its energy into growing thick and lush rather than just tall. This explains why you do not need to mow Zoysia as often as other grasses. However, the first step is to be sure that your mower blades are sharp. Dull blades tend to rip the grass ends, and they do not actually cut the grass. Whenever this occurs, your lawn may look a yellowish color. Ragged grass blades take up more water resulting in a possible increase in disease. The type of mower is less important. Sharp blades are the keys to success.

Whenever you are mowing, be sure that you do not remove more than 1/3 of the leaf blade. Zoysia does best whenever the grass is 1 ½” to 3” tall. It is possible to maintain your Zoysia lawn as low as ½”, but you just want to be sure that you are not scalping the lawn.

Whenever you are mowing, you do not have to worry about picking up the grass clippings either. Studies have shown that the grass clippings add more nitrogen to your soil causing a decrease in fertilizer use. Whenever the Zoysia goes dormant for the winter months, it is not necessary to mow or to perform any other maintenance. Low-maintenance is one of the top reasons why homeowners prefer a Zoysia lawn.

This entry was posted on Tuesday, April 24th, 2018 at 3:50 pm and is filed under Care & Maintenance, Dormancy, Growth, Landscaping, mowing, Zoysia. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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