Which one is right for me? One inch plugs, 3×3 inch super plugs for sod?


posted on July 24th, 2015 by

In the long run planting living zoysia is always more successful than planting zoysia from seed.  Now you have options on which size living plant to use, 1 inch, 3×3 inch super plugs or sod. What is the difference between these? The difference lies in the time, effort, money and how soon you want a full zoysia lawn.  The same Amazoy zoysia grass is used One Inch Plugin all of these methods.

One inch plugs are the most cost efficient way to go and best for larger areas.  With these plugs you do have to finish separating the plugs which adds an additional step when planting.  Planting one inch plugs takes more time and longer for your lawn to fill in when planted 12 inches apart.

3x3 Inch Super PlugThe Super Plug, the three by three inch plug, is a better way to plant, however it is not as economical as the smaller plugs.  The 3 inch x 3 inch plugs cut down on the time and effort in planting the plugs. The Super Plugs come already cut into 3 inch x 3 inch squares.  All you have to do is take them out of the tray and place them right in the hole you have made, fill in around the roots, step on the plug and water.

Sod is great for an instant lawn, however it can be expensive to Sodcover your lawn in sod.  You would also need a completely clear soil bed to lay the sod.

No matter which way you decide to plant your zoysia lawn, all will provide a beautiful, full, thick carpet of Amazoy zoysia grass for decades to come.

This entry was posted on Friday, July 24th, 2015 at 10:46 am and is filed under Growth, Planting, Zoysia. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

4 Responses to “Which one is right for me? One inch plugs, 3×3 inch super plugs for sod?”

  1. Jan Says:

    August 10th, 2015 at 4:12 am

    Hello, first i would like to say i think your website and videos are really informative and i have read just about every thing you have had to say about this zoysia grass and watched almost every video, thanks for great information. I live in northeast nevada, elevation 5060 feet, we have cold winters and hot dry summers most of the time, I was wondering what time of the year I should order the plugs to plant here.
    Also i didn’t see the price for the 3 x 3 plugs however i did do a calculation for the 1″ plugs.

    Interested in your return reply and thanks again for such a nice website.

    Regards,
    Jan

  2. SecureAdminZ Says:

    August 10th, 2015 at 10:47 am

    Hi Jan,
    We are happy to hear you have enjoyed our website. Amazoy zoysia grass grows well in Nevada, it can withstand temperatures from 120 degrees to -30 degrees. If you are looking at another type of zoysia, please check and make sure they can tolerate these temperatures, many of the zoysia strands cannot. Also as long as your elevation is below 5700 feet you will be fine. If you would like to contact our Customer Service Department they will be happy to help you with the 3×3 inch prices. Our Customer Service Number is 410-756-2311 between 8:00am to 4:30 pm, Monday thru Friday, Eastern Time.

  3. Pat Says:

    August 27th, 2015 at 3:09 pm

    Love my new Zoysia grass back lawn. I used the plugs watered as suggested and my lawn is thick and lush in the Ca. Drought with little watering. My front lawn is under a 100 year old tree and shady is there a zoysia I can use? Depending on the area the lawn gets 1-3hours of sun a day filtered by the tree. Thanks

  4. SecureAdminZ Says:

    August 28th, 2015 at 8:11 am

    Hi Pat,
    It is great to hear your new zoysia lawn is handling the California drought conditions. Getting any grass to grow in a very shady area is difficult. There are over 3 dozen different types of zoysia grass, each one a little different. Some of the most shade tolerant that I know of is El Toro or Zeon. I would suggest researching these types of zoysia before planting to make sure their other characteristic are what you want.

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